Editorial

Editorial In the past few months when taking over the editorship of ELT Journal, I have come to realize, to my happiness and relief, that being an editor is not a lonely affair. Within ELT Journal especially, as a new editor, I have learnt to appreciate the important roles of colleagues working in ELT and contributing to the smooth running of the journal from behind the curtains, so to speak. They are the Advisory Board, who advise on various aspects of the journal, and the Editorial Panel, who contribute to the quality and coverage by reviewing the articles submitted to the journal and the editors of specific features. Without their support and help there would be no journal! Although there is no space for mentioning all the individuals, I would like to thank just a few for their specific contributions, and to start by acknowledging Graham Hall’s editorship over the past five years. During this time, his expert and wide-ranging knowledge of the field together with his dedication to the journal and the profession have made the ELT Journal an even more vibrant publication in the field than it already was. His introduction of new features, such as Changing English, Editor’s Choice, and the Special Issues, has extended the coverage of the journal and its outreach, while his encouraging support and careful feedback have helped me tremendously as incoming editor. Three other expert contributors are involved with making sure that key features of the journal keep running: Nicky Hockly with ‘Technology for the Language Teachers’ and Richard Smith with ‘Key Concepts’. David Baker is (sadly!) stepping down after having set up and run ‘Changing English’, but the feature may continue in the same or a different form. Thank you to all three for making the Journal both more diverse and focused at the same time! And, last but not least, my personal thanks also go to Cristina Whitecross for her incessant support as independent consultant for the Journal, and to Jane Magrane for her efficient editorial help. So what kinds of papers will be welcome? I believe ELT Journal is a publication like no other: a journal that is not concerned with primary research, but aims to bring together theory and classroom practice. The strength of the Journal, therefore, lies in its strong link between research and practice, with every issue containing practice-related articles that are informed by theoretical discussion. As editor, I will be looking for contributions which critically reflect on current practices in ELT and promote discussion of issues that unite or divide scholars and practitioners in ELT. ELT Journal is also an international publication, and its papers should reflect this. As the aims state, articles in the Journal concern English in different contexts, as a ‘second, additional, or foreign language, or as an international Lingua Franca’. The spectrum of English is wide and therefore not limited to English mother-tongue communities. The interest lies at the intersections between the local and the global, or, in other words, how local ELT practices, or specific concerns in relation to individual settings can shed light on, or contribute to, more general ELT issues or similar concerns in other contexts. So, papers that cover practices in a specific country, an institution or a community, but make their ideas relevant for other contexts, are very welcome. And what about the future? I am not sure what the future of ELT Journal may bring but I can see developments in various areas that may be of interest to the readers: reflections and projects related to multilingual practices in ELT, the fast-developing and debated area of English Medium Instruction, the continued engagement of English as a Lingua Franca or Global Englishes with language education practices, and the topical issue of refugees and asylum seekers in English classes around the world, among many others. Finally, as editor, I can only speculate on future developments, but my role is to encourage and support submissions that you find relevant and interesting. It is you as readers and authors of our papers that determine the content of the journal, ensure its relevance for the field, and help keep the journal successful for the future. So do feel free to get in touch to let me know your thoughts. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ELT Journal Oxford University Press

Editorial

ELT Journal , Volume 72 (1) – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved.
ISSN
0951-0893
eISSN
1477-4526
D.O.I.
10.1093/elt/ccx069
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the past few months when taking over the editorship of ELT Journal, I have come to realize, to my happiness and relief, that being an editor is not a lonely affair. Within ELT Journal especially, as a new editor, I have learnt to appreciate the important roles of colleagues working in ELT and contributing to the smooth running of the journal from behind the curtains, so to speak. They are the Advisory Board, who advise on various aspects of the journal, and the Editorial Panel, who contribute to the quality and coverage by reviewing the articles submitted to the journal and the editors of specific features. Without their support and help there would be no journal! Although there is no space for mentioning all the individuals, I would like to thank just a few for their specific contributions, and to start by acknowledging Graham Hall’s editorship over the past five years. During this time, his expert and wide-ranging knowledge of the field together with his dedication to the journal and the profession have made the ELT Journal an even more vibrant publication in the field than it already was. His introduction of new features, such as Changing English, Editor’s Choice, and the Special Issues, has extended the coverage of the journal and its outreach, while his encouraging support and careful feedback have helped me tremendously as incoming editor. Three other expert contributors are involved with making sure that key features of the journal keep running: Nicky Hockly with ‘Technology for the Language Teachers’ and Richard Smith with ‘Key Concepts’. David Baker is (sadly!) stepping down after having set up and run ‘Changing English’, but the feature may continue in the same or a different form. Thank you to all three for making the Journal both more diverse and focused at the same time! And, last but not least, my personal thanks also go to Cristina Whitecross for her incessant support as independent consultant for the Journal, and to Jane Magrane for her efficient editorial help. So what kinds of papers will be welcome? I believe ELT Journal is a publication like no other: a journal that is not concerned with primary research, but aims to bring together theory and classroom practice. The strength of the Journal, therefore, lies in its strong link between research and practice, with every issue containing practice-related articles that are informed by theoretical discussion. As editor, I will be looking for contributions which critically reflect on current practices in ELT and promote discussion of issues that unite or divide scholars and practitioners in ELT. ELT Journal is also an international publication, and its papers should reflect this. As the aims state, articles in the Journal concern English in different contexts, as a ‘second, additional, or foreign language, or as an international Lingua Franca’. The spectrum of English is wide and therefore not limited to English mother-tongue communities. The interest lies at the intersections between the local and the global, or, in other words, how local ELT practices, or specific concerns in relation to individual settings can shed light on, or contribute to, more general ELT issues or similar concerns in other contexts. So, papers that cover practices in a specific country, an institution or a community, but make their ideas relevant for other contexts, are very welcome. And what about the future? I am not sure what the future of ELT Journal may bring but I can see developments in various areas that may be of interest to the readers: reflections and projects related to multilingual practices in ELT, the fast-developing and debated area of English Medium Instruction, the continued engagement of English as a Lingua Franca or Global Englishes with language education practices, and the topical issue of refugees and asylum seekers in English classes around the world, among many others. Finally, as editor, I can only speculate on future developments, but my role is to encourage and support submissions that you find relevant and interesting. It is you as readers and authors of our papers that determine the content of the journal, ensure its relevance for the field, and help keep the journal successful for the future. So do feel free to get in touch to let me know your thoughts. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved.

Journal

ELT JournalOxford University Press

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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