Editorial Statement

Editorial Statement Aims of the journal The Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society publishes multidisciplinary international research on the spatial dimensions of contemporary socio-economic-political change. The Journal adopts a focused thematic format. Each issue is devoted to a particular theme selected by the international editorial team. The aim of the Journal is to understand the formative changes and developments associated with the new spatial foundations of today’s globalising world. It also examines how changes in the global economy are playing out across different spatial scales. Each issue is prefaced by an introduction from the Editors on the topic covered. Authors are encouraged to engage with the public policy implications of the issues they address. The Journal is keen to encourage articles from a diverse range of theoretical perspectives. Within this remit the Journal will publish papers that include one or more of the following: Cutting-edge multidisciplinary research Incisive critical reviews of the ‘state of the art’ of the topic in question Engagement with and interrogation of contemporary policy issues and debates Globalization at a critical conjuncture? The Global Financial Crisis and subsequent Great Recession of 2008–2010 revealed the new global capitalism for what it really was—a highly unbalanced, debt-driven and unsustainable model of economic growth and development. It was furthermore a model that generated new and increased inequalities, social and spatial, both within the advanced economies and the BRIC countries. While some nations, regions and cities gained from globalisation, notably the major centres of finance, technology, and corporate and political power, other regions and cities, notably those that had led the preceding era of industrial capitalism, have been the losers, suffering from slow growth, stagnant incomes, insecure work and higher unemployment. Perhaps not surprisingly, though not widely anticipated by those it benefited, this model is now being increasingly challenged. Populism is on the march, particularly from those communities and groups that feel they have been left behind and marginalised by neoliberal globalisation and have borne the brunt of its negative consequences and rapid re-orderings. What unites these varied strands is a disillusionment with major institutions, political parties and political and business elites, particularly those located in the national metropolitan capitals and global ‘hotspots’. The articles for this special 10th Anniversary issue of CJRES fall into three groups: a consideration of world perspectives on the current changes; an examination of the reasons for recent voting patterns reflecting what has been called ‘populism’; and commentary on the issues around globalisation and current economic and political changes. In the first group, Rory Horner et al. look at the shifting geography of uneven global development, Xiangming Chen considers the processes of urbanisation, development and globalisation connecting China’s domestic transformation and its strong impact in the Global South, while Peter van Bergeijk takes a historical perspective on the Great Depression and the Great Recession. Voters, their concerns and behaviour are the focus of the next section, with Jürgen Essletzbichler et al. comparing the rise of the populist vote across three countries, while Ian Gordon investigates how populist support across European regions is influenced by the interaction of economic/demographic change with varying cosmopolitan/localist influences, and Jason Spicer looks at the interaction of globalisation’s inter-regional disparities with majoritarian electoral systems. Neil Lee et al. find that physical immobility is one key to the Brexit vote, while Harry Garretsen et al. evaluate the importance of regional personality traits among pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit voters. The final group sees Finbarr Livesey considering the shifting manufacturing component of globalisation, and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose looking at what to do about the revenge of the ‘places that don’t matter’. The issue concludes with two appreciations of Susan Christopherson (1947–2016), a valued member of our Editorial Board from its inception 10 years ago. Forthcoming issues The next issue of CJRES, to be published in July 2018, looks at ‘Regional transformation: changing industrial organization in space’. In recent years, interest in understanding the sources, processes and determinants of economic diversification and the transformation of regions has been growing, grounded in part in the experience that formerly successful regions face in the struggle to recreate themselves. This requirement of regional transformation is not unique to regions down on their luck; even the most vibrant urban or regional economies and their key clusters require an ongoing churn of activities as a means of maintaining their edge in the global economy. These fundamental dynamics still remains insufficiently understood, and vital questions remain unanswered regarding the relevant drivers, dimensions and determinants, as well as policy facilitation, of successful transformation. Diverse theoretical and methodological approaches are needed to build a comprehensive understanding of the complex real-world processes involved, which are a result of the conjoined operation of multiple causal mechanisms, presently probed separately in partial theorisations focusing on one or just a few dimensions. To study transformation, we also need to grasp what it is that we are explaining; we need to spell out what is regional transformation. Not all change is transformative, so we must start with an account of transformation that apprehends the idea that the process takes a regional economy, or significant parts of it, through a major qualitative competitiveness re-orientation. Readers are invited to consult the Journal website http://cjres.oxfordjournals.org/ for more information on forthcoming subjects. The themes of the next issues are: The shrinking state? China’s new silk roads: connections, interactions and consequences Back on the agenda? Industrial policy revisited © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society Oxford University Press

Editorial Statement

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1752-1378
eISSN
1752-1386
D.O.I.
10.1093/cjres/rsy004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aims of the journal The Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society publishes multidisciplinary international research on the spatial dimensions of contemporary socio-economic-political change. The Journal adopts a focused thematic format. Each issue is devoted to a particular theme selected by the international editorial team. The aim of the Journal is to understand the formative changes and developments associated with the new spatial foundations of today’s globalising world. It also examines how changes in the global economy are playing out across different spatial scales. Each issue is prefaced by an introduction from the Editors on the topic covered. Authors are encouraged to engage with the public policy implications of the issues they address. The Journal is keen to encourage articles from a diverse range of theoretical perspectives. Within this remit the Journal will publish papers that include one or more of the following: Cutting-edge multidisciplinary research Incisive critical reviews of the ‘state of the art’ of the topic in question Engagement with and interrogation of contemporary policy issues and debates Globalization at a critical conjuncture? The Global Financial Crisis and subsequent Great Recession of 2008–2010 revealed the new global capitalism for what it really was—a highly unbalanced, debt-driven and unsustainable model of economic growth and development. It was furthermore a model that generated new and increased inequalities, social and spatial, both within the advanced economies and the BRIC countries. While some nations, regions and cities gained from globalisation, notably the major centres of finance, technology, and corporate and political power, other regions and cities, notably those that had led the preceding era of industrial capitalism, have been the losers, suffering from slow growth, stagnant incomes, insecure work and higher unemployment. Perhaps not surprisingly, though not widely anticipated by those it benefited, this model is now being increasingly challenged. Populism is on the march, particularly from those communities and groups that feel they have been left behind and marginalised by neoliberal globalisation and have borne the brunt of its negative consequences and rapid re-orderings. What unites these varied strands is a disillusionment with major institutions, political parties and political and business elites, particularly those located in the national metropolitan capitals and global ‘hotspots’. The articles for this special 10th Anniversary issue of CJRES fall into three groups: a consideration of world perspectives on the current changes; an examination of the reasons for recent voting patterns reflecting what has been called ‘populism’; and commentary on the issues around globalisation and current economic and political changes. In the first group, Rory Horner et al. look at the shifting geography of uneven global development, Xiangming Chen considers the processes of urbanisation, development and globalisation connecting China’s domestic transformation and its strong impact in the Global South, while Peter van Bergeijk takes a historical perspective on the Great Depression and the Great Recession. Voters, their concerns and behaviour are the focus of the next section, with Jürgen Essletzbichler et al. comparing the rise of the populist vote across three countries, while Ian Gordon investigates how populist support across European regions is influenced by the interaction of economic/demographic change with varying cosmopolitan/localist influences, and Jason Spicer looks at the interaction of globalisation’s inter-regional disparities with majoritarian electoral systems. Neil Lee et al. find that physical immobility is one key to the Brexit vote, while Harry Garretsen et al. evaluate the importance of regional personality traits among pro-Brexit and anti-Brexit voters. The final group sees Finbarr Livesey considering the shifting manufacturing component of globalisation, and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose looking at what to do about the revenge of the ‘places that don’t matter’. The issue concludes with two appreciations of Susan Christopherson (1947–2016), a valued member of our Editorial Board from its inception 10 years ago. Forthcoming issues The next issue of CJRES, to be published in July 2018, looks at ‘Regional transformation: changing industrial organization in space’. In recent years, interest in understanding the sources, processes and determinants of economic diversification and the transformation of regions has been growing, grounded in part in the experience that formerly successful regions face in the struggle to recreate themselves. This requirement of regional transformation is not unique to regions down on their luck; even the most vibrant urban or regional economies and their key clusters require an ongoing churn of activities as a means of maintaining their edge in the global economy. These fundamental dynamics still remains insufficiently understood, and vital questions remain unanswered regarding the relevant drivers, dimensions and determinants, as well as policy facilitation, of successful transformation. Diverse theoretical and methodological approaches are needed to build a comprehensive understanding of the complex real-world processes involved, which are a result of the conjoined operation of multiple causal mechanisms, presently probed separately in partial theorisations focusing on one or just a few dimensions. To study transformation, we also need to grasp what it is that we are explaining; we need to spell out what is regional transformation. Not all change is transformative, so we must start with an account of transformation that apprehends the idea that the process takes a regional economy, or significant parts of it, through a major qualitative competitiveness re-orientation. Readers are invited to consult the Journal website http://cjres.oxfordjournals.org/ for more information on forthcoming subjects. The themes of the next issues are: The shrinking state? China’s new silk roads: connections, interactions and consequences Back on the agenda? Industrial policy revisited © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

Journal

Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and SocietyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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