Editorial

Editorial In 1728 Johann David Heinichen mused on the importance Pierluigi Farnese to attract musicians from across the Italian of travel for musicians: ‘Why do we go to the trouble, danger p eninsula for his nascent court at Piacenza. Andrew Woolley and expense of travelling to other nations where music hasu ses a keyboard manuscript now in Bergamo to elucidate more supporters than with us?’ Such journeys, he explained, how the immigrant keyboardist William Babell contributed were not primarily for personal prot o fi r to recruit foreign tal- to London’s melting-pot of French and Italian styles. Sonia ent; instead they were necessary to gain a sense of good tastW e,r onkowska uncovers manuscripts in Poland with viola ‘that philosopher’s stone of music and the chief key to musicad l a gamba music by Carl Friedrich Abel, arguing that these secrets through which human souls are unlocked and moved’. sources were taken to Milicz by Joachim Carl Maltzan, a Heinichen himself went to Venice and Rome to learn ItalianP russian diplomat to London. operatic styles first hand. The lives of countless musicians from Transfer could also bridge the divisions between religions the 15th century onwards likewise show how travel enriched and cultures. Olga Gero reveals how the Lutheran composer Dieterich Buxtehude set poetry from a Jesuit emblem book, their experience and helped them refine their technique. suggesting that his listeners might have used Jesuit practices of e s Th haring of knowledge through international exchange meditating on those images. Jon Banks and Marieke Lefeber was pivotal too to the early music revival. In the 1970s many show how a musical clock, built in London and intended for instrumentalists made the pilgrimage to Amsterdam to study the Turkish market, plays tunes derived from the Ottoman with Gustav Leonhardt, Anner Bylsma or Frans Brüggen. court repertory. Their article adds to the journal’s reputation In the 1980s London’s freelance scene attracted historically in the field of cross-cultural historical musicology, a field pio- informed performers from across the globe. The European neered by Raymond Head’s ‘Corelli in Calcutta’ (Early Mu , sic Union Baroque Orchestra institutionalized such exchange xiii (1985), pp.548–53). with its programmes for aspiring professional performers John Milsom’s review-article reflects on how best to un -der throughout Europe. Sadly the UK’s 2016 referendum deci- stand the transfer of contrapuntal material between 16th- sion to leave the European Union has led to uncertainty in century composers of polyphony. Responding to an edition of musical spheres—as in others—about the mechanisms of Masses based on Josquin motets, he advocates replacing the exchange between the UK and its neighbours in the future. term ‘parody Mass’ with ‘T-Mass’. Here ‘T’ denotes the tech- Symbolizing such uncertainty is the EUBO’s decision to niques of transfer, transformation and transfusion whereby move its base from Oxfordshire to Antwerp—a decision composers used pre-existing material for new ends. Through that has reinforced the resolve of other UK performers and close analyses, Milsom helps the reader to understand how scholars to maintain their European links. composers explored the different contrapuntal possibilities of On its foundation in 1973, Early Mu wa sic s aimed mainly given material. We invite responses to his thought-provoking at UK performers and listeners, but it has since gained a article via our correspondence columns. strongly international readership. During Tess Knighton’s Travel and transfer were not necessarily benign forces. editorship the journal became a leading forum for European David Hunter builds on his previous discovery of Handel’s scholarship, in particular helping to invigorate research investment in the slave trade, here investigating how into Iberian music. The current editors aim to maintain the the prots o fi f slavery funded the musical patronage of journal’s reputation for publishing the best scholarship from the Beckford family. One of the richest families in late Europe and beyond, and we are grateful to members of our 18th-century England, the Beckfords supported musical editorial board who encourage submissions from outside extravagances ranging from mechanical organs to private the English-speaking world. Our reviews section likewise performances of cantatas. Hunter focuses on the historical covers a broad range of scholarship including continental evidence, but his study raises ethical questions about how publications that may be overlooked by other Anglophone the present day should regard musical artefacts whose pro- journals. We thank the many publishers who send copies of duction depended on the oppressive practices of the past. their editions, monographs and recordings; your co-opera- Taken together, the articles in this issue show the ben- tion supports the vigour and richness of our reviews pages. efits of international exchange, whether undertaken by e Th themes of travel and transfer connect many of the musicians in previous centuries or by scholars and p - er articles in this issue. Uri Smilansky sheds light on Machaut’s formers in the present day. But they also remind us to connections with Central European politics, interpreting the travel responsibly, mindful of the social and ethical costs ballade Pas de tor as describing the coat of arms of Lusatia, of some journeys. and suggesting that it was used by Peter of Cyprus to win favour at the Prague court of the Holy Roman Emperor. Stephen Rose Seishiro Niwa’s posthumous article traces the efforts of Early Music, © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. page 1 of 1 doi:10.1093/em/cay031 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/em/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/em/cay031/5003013 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 07 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Early Music Oxford University Press

Editorial

Early Music , Volume Advance Article – May 24, 2018
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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0306-1078
eISSN
1741-7260
D.O.I.
10.1093/em/cay031
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Abstract

In 1728 Johann David Heinichen mused on the importance Pierluigi Farnese to attract musicians from across the Italian of travel for musicians: ‘Why do we go to the trouble, danger p eninsula for his nascent court at Piacenza. Andrew Woolley and expense of travelling to other nations where music hasu ses a keyboard manuscript now in Bergamo to elucidate more supporters than with us?’ Such journeys, he explained, how the immigrant keyboardist William Babell contributed were not primarily for personal prot o fi r to recruit foreign tal- to London’s melting-pot of French and Italian styles. Sonia ent; instead they were necessary to gain a sense of good tastW e,r onkowska uncovers manuscripts in Poland with viola ‘that philosopher’s stone of music and the chief key to musicad l a gamba music by Carl Friedrich Abel, arguing that these secrets through which human souls are unlocked and moved’. sources were taken to Milicz by Joachim Carl Maltzan, a Heinichen himself went to Venice and Rome to learn ItalianP russian diplomat to London. operatic styles first hand. The lives of countless musicians from Transfer could also bridge the divisions between religions the 15th century onwards likewise show how travel enriched and cultures. Olga Gero reveals how the Lutheran composer Dieterich Buxtehude set poetry from a Jesuit emblem book, their experience and helped them refine their technique. suggesting that his listeners might have used Jesuit practices of e s Th haring of knowledge through international exchange meditating on those images. Jon Banks and Marieke Lefeber was pivotal too to the early music revival. In the 1970s many show how a musical clock, built in London and intended for instrumentalists made the pilgrimage to Amsterdam to study the Turkish market, plays tunes derived from the Ottoman with Gustav Leonhardt, Anner Bylsma or Frans Brüggen. court repertory. Their article adds to the journal’s reputation In the 1980s London’s freelance scene attracted historically in the field of cross-cultural historical musicology, a field pio- informed performers from across the globe. The European neered by Raymond Head’s ‘Corelli in Calcutta’ (Early Mu , sic Union Baroque Orchestra institutionalized such exchange xiii (1985), pp.548–53). with its programmes for aspiring professional performers John Milsom’s review-article reflects on how best to un -der throughout Europe. Sadly the UK’s 2016 referendum deci- stand the transfer of contrapuntal material between 16th- sion to leave the European Union has led to uncertainty in century composers of polyphony. Responding to an edition of musical spheres—as in others—about the mechanisms of Masses based on Josquin motets, he advocates replacing the exchange between the UK and its neighbours in the future. term ‘parody Mass’ with ‘T-Mass’. Here ‘T’ denotes the tech- Symbolizing such uncertainty is the EUBO’s decision to niques of transfer, transformation and transfusion whereby move its base from Oxfordshire to Antwerp—a decision composers used pre-existing material for new ends. Through that has reinforced the resolve of other UK performers and close analyses, Milsom helps the reader to understand how scholars to maintain their European links. composers explored the different contrapuntal possibilities of On its foundation in 1973, Early Mu wa sic s aimed mainly given material. We invite responses to his thought-provoking at UK performers and listeners, but it has since gained a article via our correspondence columns. strongly international readership. During Tess Knighton’s Travel and transfer were not necessarily benign forces. editorship the journal became a leading forum for European David Hunter builds on his previous discovery of Handel’s scholarship, in particular helping to invigorate research investment in the slave trade, here investigating how into Iberian music. The current editors aim to maintain the the prots o fi f slavery funded the musical patronage of journal’s reputation for publishing the best scholarship from the Beckford family. One of the richest families in late Europe and beyond, and we are grateful to members of our 18th-century England, the Beckfords supported musical editorial board who encourage submissions from outside extravagances ranging from mechanical organs to private the English-speaking world. Our reviews section likewise performances of cantatas. Hunter focuses on the historical covers a broad range of scholarship including continental evidence, but his study raises ethical questions about how publications that may be overlooked by other Anglophone the present day should regard musical artefacts whose pro- journals. We thank the many publishers who send copies of duction depended on the oppressive practices of the past. their editions, monographs and recordings; your co-opera- Taken together, the articles in this issue show the ben- tion supports the vigour and richness of our reviews pages. efits of international exchange, whether undertaken by e Th themes of travel and transfer connect many of the musicians in previous centuries or by scholars and p - er articles in this issue. Uri Smilansky sheds light on Machaut’s formers in the present day. But they also remind us to connections with Central European politics, interpreting the travel responsibly, mindful of the social and ethical costs ballade Pas de tor as describing the coat of arms of Lusatia, of some journeys. and suggesting that it was used by Peter of Cyprus to win favour at the Prague court of the Holy Roman Emperor. Stephen Rose Seishiro Niwa’s posthumous article traces the efforts of Early Music, © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. page 1 of 1 doi:10.1093/em/cay031 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/em/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/em/cay031/5003013 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 07 June 2018

Journal

Early MusicOxford University Press

Published: May 24, 2018

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