Early Potentials of Direct Cortical Responses: Experimental Study in Dogs and Pathophysiological and Clinical Implications

Early Potentials of Direct Cortical Responses: Experimental Study in Dogs and Pathophysiological... AbstractOBJECTIVEThe characteristics of the early component of the direct cortical response have not been well studied, although direct cortical response recording is a common method of brain function monitoring.METHODSIn this experimental study, we sought conditions affording the clearest recording of the early potential, by varying the polarity and low-cutoff filter setting, and we confirmed that the early potential consists of two components, P1 and P2.RESULTSWhen subcortical damage was induced by local cerebral compression or saline injection, transient changes in PI and permanent disappearance of P2 were observed. P2 also disappeared when the fiber connections between the cortex and the basal ganglia, including the thalamus were destroyed by wire insertion. With deep recording, both Pt and P2 exhibited potential reversal at a level histologically confirmed to be m Layer VCONCLUSIONThese findings suggest that PI is a spike reflecting the activity of pyramidal cells evoked by electrical stimulation of the brain surface and that P2 is a potential arising in Layer V of the cortex and is related to afferent fibers from the thalamus. Recording of P2 may be useful for monitoring for subcortical damage. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Early Potentials of Direct Cortical Responses: Experimental Study in Dogs and Pathophysiological and Clinical Implications

Early Potentials of Direct Cortical Responses: Experimental Study in Dogs and Pathophysiological and Clinical Implications

EX PER IM EN TA L S T U D IE S Early Potentials of Direct Cortical Responses: Experimental Study in Dogs and Pathophysiological and C lin ica l Implications Manabu Nishikata, M.D., Shunro Endo, M.D., Kazumasa Yamatani, M.D., Nakamasa Hayashi, M.D., Ryoichi Masuda, M.D., Akira Takaku, M.D. Department of Neurosurgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, School of Medicine, Toyama, Japan OBJECTIVE: The characteristics of the early component of the direct cortical response have not been well studied, although direct cortical response recording is a common method of brain function monitoring. . . . . METHODS: In this experimental study, we sought conditions affording the clearest recording of the early potential, by varying the polarity and low-cutoff filter setting, and we confirmed that the early potential consists of two components, P1 and P2. . . . • • • * • * * RESULTS: When subcortical damage was induced by local cerebral compression or saline injection, ran i changes in P I and permanent disappearance of P2 were observed. P2 also disappeared when the fiber connec­ tions between the cortex and the basal ganglia, including the thalamus were destroyed by wire insertion. With deep recording, both Pt and P2 exhibited potential reversal at a level histologically confirmed to be m Layer V C O N C LU S IO N :'These findings suggest that P I is a spike reflecting the activity of pyramidal cells evoked by electrical stimulation of the brain surface and that P2 is a potential arising ,n Layer V of the cortex and ,s related to afferent fibers from the thalamus. Recording of P2 may be useful for monitoring for subcortical damage. (Neurosurgery 43:325-329, 1998) Keywords: Corticothalam ic circu it, D ire c t co rtical response, Early potentials, M onitoring, Subcortical lesion experimental study, we focused on the early com ponent of the irect cortical responses (DCRs) were first reported in DCR, determined conditions affording stable...
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Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199808000-00091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVEThe characteristics of the early component of the direct cortical response have not been well studied, although direct cortical response recording is a common method of brain function monitoring.METHODSIn this experimental study, we sought conditions affording the clearest recording of the early potential, by varying the polarity and low-cutoff filter setting, and we confirmed that the early potential consists of two components, P1 and P2.RESULTSWhen subcortical damage was induced by local cerebral compression or saline injection, transient changes in PI and permanent disappearance of P2 were observed. P2 also disappeared when the fiber connections between the cortex and the basal ganglia, including the thalamus were destroyed by wire insertion. With deep recording, both Pt and P2 exhibited potential reversal at a level histologically confirmed to be m Layer VCONCLUSIONThese findings suggest that PI is a spike reflecting the activity of pyramidal cells evoked by electrical stimulation of the brain surface and that P2 is a potential arising in Layer V of the cortex and is related to afferent fibers from the thalamus. Recording of P2 may be useful for monitoring for subcortical damage.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Aug 1, 1998

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