Double Hits in Schizophrenia.

Double Hits in Schizophrenia. Abstract The co-occurrence of a Copy Number Variant (CNV) and a functional variant on the other allele may be a relevant genetic mechanism in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that the cumulative burden of such double hits - in particular those composed of a deletion and a coding single nucleotide variation (SNV) - is increased in patients with schizophrenia. We combined CNV data with coding variants data in 795 patients with schizophrenia and 474 controls. To limit false CNV-detection, only CNVs called only by two algorithms we included. CNV-affected genes were subsequently examined for coding SNVs, which we termed “CNV-SNVs”. Correcting for total queried sequence, we assessed the CNV-SNV-burden and the combined predicted deleterious effect. We estimated p-values by permutation of the phenotype. We detected 105 CNV-SNVs; 67 in duplicated and 38 in deleted genic sequence. While the difference in CNV-SNVs rates was not significant, the combined deleteriousness inferred by CNV-SNVs in deleted sequence was almost fourfold higher in cases compared to controls (nominal p = 0.009). This effect may be driven by a higher number of CNV-SNVs and/or by a higher degree of predicted deleteriousness of CNV-SNVs. No such effect was observed for duplications. We provide early evidence that deletions co-occurring with a functional variant may be relevant, albeit of modest impact, for the genetic etiology of schizophrenia. Large-scale consortium studies are required to validate our findings. Sequence-based analyses would provide the best resolution for detection of CNVs as well as coding variants genome-wide. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Molecular Genetics Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0964-6906
eISSN
1460-2083
D.O.I.
10.1093/hmg/ddy175
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The co-occurrence of a Copy Number Variant (CNV) and a functional variant on the other allele may be a relevant genetic mechanism in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that the cumulative burden of such double hits - in particular those composed of a deletion and a coding single nucleotide variation (SNV) - is increased in patients with schizophrenia. We combined CNV data with coding variants data in 795 patients with schizophrenia and 474 controls. To limit false CNV-detection, only CNVs called only by two algorithms we included. CNV-affected genes were subsequently examined for coding SNVs, which we termed “CNV-SNVs”. Correcting for total queried sequence, we assessed the CNV-SNV-burden and the combined predicted deleterious effect. We estimated p-values by permutation of the phenotype. We detected 105 CNV-SNVs; 67 in duplicated and 38 in deleted genic sequence. While the difference in CNV-SNVs rates was not significant, the combined deleteriousness inferred by CNV-SNVs in deleted sequence was almost fourfold higher in cases compared to controls (nominal p = 0.009). This effect may be driven by a higher number of CNV-SNVs and/or by a higher degree of predicted deleteriousness of CNV-SNVs. No such effect was observed for duplications. We provide early evidence that deletions co-occurring with a functional variant may be relevant, albeit of modest impact, for the genetic etiology of schizophrenia. Large-scale consortium studies are required to validate our findings. Sequence-based analyses would provide the best resolution for detection of CNVs as well as coding variants genome-wide. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Human Molecular GeneticsOxford University Press

Published: May 14, 2018

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