Diversity, specificity, co-occurrence and hub taxa of the bacterial–fungal pollen microbiome

Diversity, specificity, co-occurrence and hub taxa of the bacterial–fungal pollen microbiome Abstract Flower pollen represents a unique microbial habitat, however the factors driving microbial assemblages and microbe–microbe interactions remain largely unexplored. Here we compared the structure and diversity of the bacterial–fungal microbiome between eight different pollen species (four wind–pollinated and four insect–pollinated) from close geographical locations, using high-throughput sequencing of a 16S the rRNA gene fragment (bacteria) and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2, fungi). Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were the most abundant bacterial and fungal phyla, respectively. Pseudomonas (bacterial) and Cladosporium (fungal) were the most abundant genera. Both bacterial and fungal microbiota were significantly influenced by plant species and pollination type, but showed a core microbiome consisting of 12 bacterial and 33 fungal genera. Co-occurrence analysis highlighted significant inter- and intra-kingdom interactions, and the interaction network was shaped by four bacterial hub taxa: Methylobacterium (two OTUs), Friedmanniella and Rosenbergiella. Rosenbergiella prevailed in insect-pollinated pollen and was negatively correlated with the other hubs, indicating habitat complementarity. Inter-kingdom co–occurrence showed a predominant effect of fungal on bacterial taxa. This study enhances our basic knowledge of pollen microbiota, and poses the basis for further inter- and intra–kingdom interaction studies in the plant reproductive organs. Flower pollen, microbiome, inter–kingdom diversity, intra–kingdom diversity, core microbiome, hub species © FEMS 2018. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png FEMS Microbiology Ecology Oxford University Press

Diversity, specificity, co-occurrence and hub taxa of the bacterial–fungal pollen microbiome

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/diversity-specificity-co-occurrence-and-hub-taxa-of-the-bacterial-ZobsboUv06
Publisher
Blackwell
Copyright
© FEMS 2018.
ISSN
0168-6496
eISSN
1574-6941
D.O.I.
10.1093/femsec/fiy112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Flower pollen represents a unique microbial habitat, however the factors driving microbial assemblages and microbe–microbe interactions remain largely unexplored. Here we compared the structure and diversity of the bacterial–fungal microbiome between eight different pollen species (four wind–pollinated and four insect–pollinated) from close geographical locations, using high-throughput sequencing of a 16S the rRNA gene fragment (bacteria) and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2, fungi). Proteobacteria and Ascomycota were the most abundant bacterial and fungal phyla, respectively. Pseudomonas (bacterial) and Cladosporium (fungal) were the most abundant genera. Both bacterial and fungal microbiota were significantly influenced by plant species and pollination type, but showed a core microbiome consisting of 12 bacterial and 33 fungal genera. Co-occurrence analysis highlighted significant inter- and intra-kingdom interactions, and the interaction network was shaped by four bacterial hub taxa: Methylobacterium (two OTUs), Friedmanniella and Rosenbergiella. Rosenbergiella prevailed in insect-pollinated pollen and was negatively correlated with the other hubs, indicating habitat complementarity. Inter-kingdom co–occurrence showed a predominant effect of fungal on bacterial taxa. This study enhances our basic knowledge of pollen microbiota, and poses the basis for further inter- and intra–kingdom interaction studies in the plant reproductive organs. Flower pollen, microbiome, inter–kingdom diversity, intra–kingdom diversity, core microbiome, hub species © FEMS 2018. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

FEMS Microbiology EcologyOxford University Press

Published: Jun 6, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off