Design Strategy of the Sabes Study: Diagnosis and Treatment of Early HIV Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men and Transgender Women in Lima, Peru, 2013–2017

Design Strategy of the Sabes Study: Diagnosis and Treatment of Early HIV Infection Among Men Who... Abstract The Sabes study evaluates a treatment-as-prevention intervention in cis-gender men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru, populations disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. The intervention is designed to prevent onward transmission of HIV by identifying HIV-negative, high-risk individuals, testing them monthly for the presence of HIV, and then rapidly treating those who become HIV positive. The main outcome of interest is the development of a model predicting the population-level impact of early detection of HIV infection and immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in this population From July 2013 to September 2015, 3,336 subjects were screened for HIV; 2,682 (80.4%) were negative and 2,084 began monthly testing. We identified 248 individuals shortly after HIV acquisition, 215 of whom were enrolled in the treatment phase of our study. All participants were followed for 48 weeks and then were referred to the Peruvian Ministry of Health to continue free HIV care and treatment. This intervention demonstrates that it is possible to recruit high-risk individuals, screen them for HIV, continue to test those who are initially HIV negative in order to identify incident cases shortly after acquisition, and then rapidly link them to care. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, diagnosis, epidemics, HIV infections, Peru, sexual minorities © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Design Strategy of the Sabes Study: Diagnosis and Treatment of Early HIV Infection Among Men Who Have Sex With Men and Transgender Women in Lima, Peru, 2013–2017

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
D.O.I.
10.1093/aje/kwy030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The Sabes study evaluates a treatment-as-prevention intervention in cis-gender men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru, populations disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. The intervention is designed to prevent onward transmission of HIV by identifying HIV-negative, high-risk individuals, testing them monthly for the presence of HIV, and then rapidly treating those who become HIV positive. The main outcome of interest is the development of a model predicting the population-level impact of early detection of HIV infection and immediate initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in this population From July 2013 to September 2015, 3,336 subjects were screened for HIV; 2,682 (80.4%) were negative and 2,084 began monthly testing. We identified 248 individuals shortly after HIV acquisition, 215 of whom were enrolled in the treatment phase of our study. All participants were followed for 48 weeks and then were referred to the Peruvian Ministry of Health to continue free HIV care and treatment. This intervention demonstrates that it is possible to recruit high-risk individuals, screen them for HIV, continue to test those who are initially HIV negative in order to identify incident cases shortly after acquisition, and then rapidly link them to care. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, diagnosis, epidemics, HIV infections, Peru, sexual minorities © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Mar 7, 2018

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