Dans l’ombre de la capitale. Les petites villes sur l’eau et Paris au XVe siècle

Dans l’ombre de la capitale. Les petites villes sur l’eau et Paris au XVe siècle This major study of ten towns located along the river systems surrounding Paris in the fifteenth century lies at the intersection of several fields which have developed in the past few decades in medieval urban history, notably: the impact of the rise of regnal or regional capitals; the nature of urban networks and the economic life of small towns. The communities in question are Mantes, Meulan, Pontoise, Poissy, Saint-Denis, Meaux, Lagny, Melun, Corbeil and Étampes. The research investment in this book (based on a 2014 doctoral thesis) is impressive, and includes the records of the royal administration at various levels, the surviving Parisian material, the archives of the major ecclesiastical establishments of the region and the muniments of the small towns themselves, where these are available (e.g. Mantes). After an opening section which considers the natural features which made the Parisian region a seedbed of urban development, and within that the hierarchies which characterized this urban network, Guittonneau goes on to examine the legal and institutional means by which the Parisian prévôté des marchands exercised control over the region (Part II). A fascinating third section replete with detailed case studies traces human interactions between the capital and its surrounding urban network. The study concludes with a final section considering political aspects of relations between the small towns in question and higher powers, in particular the king and the Parisian authorities. Guittonneau succeeds in demonstrating the existence of an urban network of small towns which lived in the shadow of the great city and which was inevitably closely tied to the economic and political power of the capital, especially in times of war, but which was also open to interactions and influences with communities and powers further afield, such as Lancastrian Rouen or the cities under Burgundian rule in the north. It is a pity there is no place in the bibliography for G.L. Thompson’s valuable study of Paris and its people under English rule (1990) or his work on the town of Saint-Denis (1989), one of the author’s chosen subjects, but in so many other respects this book constitutes a substantial contribution to the study of fifteenth-century France, and late medieval urban history more generally. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of French History. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png French History Oxford University Press

Dans l’ombre de la capitale. Les petites villes sur l’eau et Paris au XVe siècle

French History , Volume Advance Article (2) – May 24, 2018

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/dans-l-ombre-de-la-capitale-les-petites-villes-sur-l-eau-et-paris-au-5otFrjJ3fe
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of French History. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
0269-1191
eISSN
1477-4542
D.O.I.
10.1093/fh/cry024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This major study of ten towns located along the river systems surrounding Paris in the fifteenth century lies at the intersection of several fields which have developed in the past few decades in medieval urban history, notably: the impact of the rise of regnal or regional capitals; the nature of urban networks and the economic life of small towns. The communities in question are Mantes, Meulan, Pontoise, Poissy, Saint-Denis, Meaux, Lagny, Melun, Corbeil and Étampes. The research investment in this book (based on a 2014 doctoral thesis) is impressive, and includes the records of the royal administration at various levels, the surviving Parisian material, the archives of the major ecclesiastical establishments of the region and the muniments of the small towns themselves, where these are available (e.g. Mantes). After an opening section which considers the natural features which made the Parisian region a seedbed of urban development, and within that the hierarchies which characterized this urban network, Guittonneau goes on to examine the legal and institutional means by which the Parisian prévôté des marchands exercised control over the region (Part II). A fascinating third section replete with detailed case studies traces human interactions between the capital and its surrounding urban network. The study concludes with a final section considering political aspects of relations between the small towns in question and higher powers, in particular the king and the Parisian authorities. Guittonneau succeeds in demonstrating the existence of an urban network of small towns which lived in the shadow of the great city and which was inevitably closely tied to the economic and political power of the capital, especially in times of war, but which was also open to interactions and influences with communities and powers further afield, such as Lancastrian Rouen or the cities under Burgundian rule in the north. It is a pity there is no place in the bibliography for G.L. Thompson’s valuable study of Paris and its people under English rule (1990) or his work on the town of Saint-Denis (1989), one of the author’s chosen subjects, but in so many other respects this book constitutes a substantial contribution to the study of fifteenth-century France, and late medieval urban history more generally. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for the Study of French History. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

French HistoryOxford University Press

Published: May 24, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off