Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Nimodipine Treatment after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Surgery

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Nimodipine Treatment after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and... AbstractOBJECTIVETo assess the cost-effectiveness ratio of nimodipine administration after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and surgery.METHODSOne hundred twenty-seven patients of both sexes who had a ruptured aneurysm (verified using angiography), who presented with Hunt and Hess Grades I to III on admission, who underwent an operation within the first week after SAH, and who had participated in a randomized prospective clinical trial of nimodipine medication were enrolled in the study. The efficiency (cost-effectiveness) of nimodipine treatment was evaluated by incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. The cost-effectiveness ratio was evaluated for two groups: patients treated with nimodipine and patients given placebo. The cost was estimated as direct hospitalization costs, and the patient outcome was measured as life years gained.RESULTSThe incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for nimodipine treatment was $223 per life year gained on the basis of 1996 monetary values and contemporary management of SAH. Patients in the nimodipine group had an average of 3.46 years longer life expectancy (incremental effectiveness) than those in the placebo group. There was a significant difference in 3-month follow-up mortality and a slight difference in sickness pensions during the 10 years after SAH. Nimodipine treatment was associated with a significant decrease in mortality. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups in the length of hospital stay. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups in sickness pensions.CONCLUSIONNimodipine is cost-effective. Therefore, its use in the management of patients with SAH seems economically justified because it increases patient life years at very low incremental cost. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Nimodipine Treatment after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Surgery

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Nimodipine Treatment after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Surgery

Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Nimodipine Treatment after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Surgery Petri Karinen, M.Sc., Pirjo Koivukangas, Ph.D., Arto Ohinmaa, Ph.D., John Koivukangas, M.D., Ph.D., Juha Ohman, M.D., Ph.D. Departm ents o f Neurosurgery (PKa, A O , JK) and Econom ics (PKo), U niversity o f O u lu , O u lu , and D epartm ent o f N eurosurgery (JO), H elsinki U niversity H ospital, H elsinki, Finland O BJEC T IV E: To assess the cost-effectiveness ratio of nimodipine administration after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and surgery. M ETH O D S: One hundred twenty-seven patients of both sexes who had a ruptured aneurysm (verified using angiography), who presented with Hunt and Hess Grades I to III on admission, who underwent an operation within the first week after SAH, and who had participated in a randomized prospective clinical trial of nimodipine medication were enrolled in the study. The efficiency (cost-effectiveness) of nimodipine treatment was evaluated by incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. The cost-effectiveness ratio was evaluated for two groups: patients treated with nimodipine and patients given placebo. The cost was estimated as direct hospitalization costs, and the patient outcome was measured as life years gained. RESULTS: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for nimodipine treatment was $223 per life year gained on the basis of 1996 monetary values and contemporary management of SAH. Patients in the nimodipine group had an average of 3.46 years longer life expectancy (incremental effectiveness) than those in the placebo group. There was a significant difference in 3-month follow-up mortality and a slight difference in sickness pensions during the 10 years after SAH. Nimodipine treatment was associated with a significant decrease in mortality. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups in the length of hospital stay. There were no statistically significant differences...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/cost-effectiveness-analysis-of-nimodipine-treatment-after-aneurysmal-OccusajrSP
Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199910000-00009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVETo assess the cost-effectiveness ratio of nimodipine administration after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and surgery.METHODSOne hundred twenty-seven patients of both sexes who had a ruptured aneurysm (verified using angiography), who presented with Hunt and Hess Grades I to III on admission, who underwent an operation within the first week after SAH, and who had participated in a randomized prospective clinical trial of nimodipine medication were enrolled in the study. The efficiency (cost-effectiveness) of nimodipine treatment was evaluated by incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. The cost-effectiveness ratio was evaluated for two groups: patients treated with nimodipine and patients given placebo. The cost was estimated as direct hospitalization costs, and the patient outcome was measured as life years gained.RESULTSThe incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for nimodipine treatment was $223 per life year gained on the basis of 1996 monetary values and contemporary management of SAH. Patients in the nimodipine group had an average of 3.46 years longer life expectancy (incremental effectiveness) than those in the placebo group. There was a significant difference in 3-month follow-up mortality and a slight difference in sickness pensions during the 10 years after SAH. Nimodipine treatment was associated with a significant decrease in mortality. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups in the length of hospital stay. There were no statistically significant differences between the treatment groups in sickness pensions.CONCLUSIONNimodipine is cost-effective. Therefore, its use in the management of patients with SAH seems economically justified because it increases patient life years at very low incremental cost.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Oct 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial