Contributors

Contributors Michael J. Allen is an associate professor of History at Northwestern University and author of Until The Last Man Comes Home: POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam War(Chapel Hill, NC, 2009). He is currently at work on a book provisionally titled New Politics: The Imperial Presidency and the Remaking of the Political Left, 1933–1993, which examines the changing relationship between presidential power and left-liberal politics in the latter half of the twentieth-century. Shaiel Ben-Ephraim is Postdoctoral Fellow at the Nazarian Center at the University of California, Los Angeles. He recently completed his PhD in Military and Strategic Studies at the Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary. Shaiel is the winner of the 2015 Baruch Kimmerling prize awarded by the Association for Israel Studies and has taught at the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, and UCLA. Robert Buzzanco is Professor of History at the University of Houston. He is the author of several books and other publications about the Vietnam War and other aspects of U.S. foreign relations. Nick Cullather is an editor of Diplomatic History. Jessica Elkind is associate professor of history at San Francisco State University, where she teaches courses on U.S. foreign relations and Southeast Asian history. Her book Aid Under Fire: Nation Building and the Vietnam War (Lexington, KY, 2016) examines the role of American aid workers in implementing nation-building programs and development efforts in South Vietnam between 1955 and 1965. She is currently working on a study of U.S.-Cambodian relations in the 1970s. Sean Fear is Lecturer in Modern International History at the University of Leeds. He received his PhD from Cornell University in 2016. His current project examines United States-South Vietnamese diplomacy and domestic politics during South Vietnam’s Second Republic (1967–1975). Marilyn Irvin Holt is a former director of publications for the Kansas State Historical Society and adjunct instructor at the University of Kansas. As a historian and researcher, she has been a consultant for PBS documentaries produced for Kansas PBS stations and for the national The American Experience. Her book publications include Cold War Kids: Politics and Childhood in Postwar America, 1945–60 (Lawrence, KS, 2014). Jerry Lembcke is emeritus professor of sociology at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. He is the author of eight books including The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam (New York, 2000); CNN’s Tailwind Tale: Inside Vietnam’s Last Great Myth (New York, 2003); and Hanoi Jane: War, Sex, and Fantasies of Betrayal (Amherst, MA, 2010). Lembcke is a Distinguished Lecturer of the Organization of American Historians. Kyle Longley is the Snell Family Dean’s Distinguished Professor of History and Political Science at Arizona State University. He is the author of six books and editor of two others, including works focusing on Vietnam such as Senator Albert Gore, Sr.: Tennessee Maverick (Baton Rouge, LA, 2004), Grunts: The American Combat Soldier in Vietnam (New York, 2008), The Morenci Marines: A Tale of a Small Town and the Vietnam War (Lawrence, KS, 2013) and LBJ’s 1968: Power, Politics, and the Presidency in America’s Year of Upheaval (Cambridge, UK, 2018), and the forthcoming co-authored, In Harm’s Way: A Military History of the United States (Oxford, UK, December 2018). Sean L. Malloy is an Associate Professor of History and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) at the University of California, Merced. He is the author of Atomic Tragedy: Henry L. Stimson and the Decision to Use the Bomb Against Japan (Ithaca, NY, 2008) and, most recently, Out of Oakland: Black Panther Party Internationalism During the Cold War (Ithaca, NY, 2017). His current research project examines the battle in the United States over Boycott, Divestment, and Sanction (BDS), a response to the Israeli occupation of Palestine. Edwin A. Martini is Professor of History at Western Michigan University, where he currently serves as Associate Dean of Extended University Programs. He is the author and editor of several books, including Agent Orange: History, Science, and the Politics of Uncertainty (2012) and At War: The Military and American Culture in the Twentieth Century and Beyond (co-edited with David Kieran; 2018). David S. Painter teaches international history at Georgetown University. His publications include Oil and the American Century: The Political Economy of U.S. Foreign Oil Policy, 1941–1954; The Cold War: An International History; and Origins of the Cold War: An International History (co-edited with Melvyn P. Leffler); and articles on U.S. policy toward the Third World, U.S. oil policies, and the Cold War. Daniel J. Sargent is associate professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of A Superpower Transformed: The Remaking of American Foreign Relations in the 1970s (New York, 2015) and a co-editor of The Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective (Cambridge, MA, 2010). He is completing a textbook project on U.S. history in a global context, which will be published by W.W. Norton. He is presently working on an interpretive history of the American world order, from which this issue’s lecture is drawn. Katherine A. S. Sibley most recently edited A Companion to First Ladies (New York, 2016); her monographs include First Lady Florence Harding: Behind the Tragedy and Controversy (Lawrence, KS, 2009), Red Spies in America: Stolen Secrets and the Dawn of the Cold War (Lawrence, KS, 2004), and Loans and Legitimacy: The Evolution of Soviet-American Relations (Lexington, KY, 1996). In 2012, she guest-edited an issue of Diplomatic History on gender and sexuality. She serves on the executive committee of the Historians of American Communism, as well as the Historical Advisory Committee for the United States Department of State. Heather Marie Stur is General Buford Blount Professor of Military History at the University of Southern Mississippi and a fellow in USM’s Dale Center for the Study of War & Society. She is the author of Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era (Cambridge, UK, 2011) and co-editor of Integrating the U.S. Military: Race, Gender, and Sexuality Since World War II (Baltimore, MD, 2017). She is currently writing two books: Saigon at War: South Vietnam and the Global Sixties(Cambridge, forthcoming) and Reflecting America: U.S. Military Expansion and Global Interventions (Praeger, forthcoming). Stur’s writing has appeared in publications including the New York Times,the National Interest, the Orange County Register, and Diplomatic History. Nu-Anh Tran is an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut. She holds a joint appointment in the History Department and the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. She specializes in Vietnamese history, and her research interests include Vietnamese nationalism, the Vietnam War, and the Republic of Vietnam. Her review of The Vietnam War was originally presented at a panel discussion at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in 2017. Kara Dixon Vuic is the LCpl. Benjamin W. Schmidt Professor of War, Conflict, and Society in Twentieth-Century America at Texas Christian University and the author of The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines (Cambridge, MA, 2018, forthcoming) and Officer, Nurse, Woman: The Army Nurse Corps in the Vietnam War (Baltimore, MD, 2009). Jonathan Reed Winkler is professor and chair of the Department of History at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. He is the author of Nexus: Strategic Communications and American Security in World War I(Cambridge, MA, 2008). He contributed “Technology and the Environment in the Global Economy” to the second edition of America in the World: The Historiography of U.S. Foreign Relations since 1941 (Cambridge, UK, 2014). His current book project examines the strategic and diplomatic effort to place the United States at the center of the global communications network in the 20th century. Judy Tzu-Chun Wu is a professor and chair of the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. She authored Dr. Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: the Life of a Wartime Celebrity(Berkeley, CA, 2005) and Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era(Ithaca, NY, 2013). Her current book project, a collaboration with political scientist Gwendolyn Mink, explores the political career of Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color U.S. congressional representative and the co-sponsor of Title IX. Salim Yaqub is professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Director of UCSB’s Center for Cold War Studies and International History. He is the author of Containing Arab Nationalism: The Eisenhower Doctrine and the Middle East (Chapel Hill, NC, 2004) and several articles and book chapters on the history of U.S. foreign relations, the international politics of the Middle East, and Arab American political activism. His second book is Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s (Ithaca, NY, 2016). © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diplomatic History Oxford University Press

Contributors

Diplomatic History , Volume Advance Article (3) – May 7, 2018

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Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Copyright
© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0145-2096
eISSN
1467-7709
D.O.I.
10.1093/dh/dhy034
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Abstract

Michael J. Allen is an associate professor of History at Northwestern University and author of Until The Last Man Comes Home: POWs, MIAs, and the Unending Vietnam War(Chapel Hill, NC, 2009). He is currently at work on a book provisionally titled New Politics: The Imperial Presidency and the Remaking of the Political Left, 1933–1993, which examines the changing relationship between presidential power and left-liberal politics in the latter half of the twentieth-century. Shaiel Ben-Ephraim is Postdoctoral Fellow at the Nazarian Center at the University of California, Los Angeles. He recently completed his PhD in Military and Strategic Studies at the Centre for Military, Security and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary. Shaiel is the winner of the 2015 Baruch Kimmerling prize awarded by the Association for Israel Studies and has taught at the University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, and UCLA. Robert Buzzanco is Professor of History at the University of Houston. He is the author of several books and other publications about the Vietnam War and other aspects of U.S. foreign relations. Nick Cullather is an editor of Diplomatic History. Jessica Elkind is associate professor of history at San Francisco State University, where she teaches courses on U.S. foreign relations and Southeast Asian history. Her book Aid Under Fire: Nation Building and the Vietnam War (Lexington, KY, 2016) examines the role of American aid workers in implementing nation-building programs and development efforts in South Vietnam between 1955 and 1965. She is currently working on a study of U.S.-Cambodian relations in the 1970s. Sean Fear is Lecturer in Modern International History at the University of Leeds. He received his PhD from Cornell University in 2016. His current project examines United States-South Vietnamese diplomacy and domestic politics during South Vietnam’s Second Republic (1967–1975). Marilyn Irvin Holt is a former director of publications for the Kansas State Historical Society and adjunct instructor at the University of Kansas. As a historian and researcher, she has been a consultant for PBS documentaries produced for Kansas PBS stations and for the national The American Experience. Her book publications include Cold War Kids: Politics and Childhood in Postwar America, 1945–60 (Lawrence, KS, 2014). Jerry Lembcke is emeritus professor of sociology at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. He is the author of eight books including The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam (New York, 2000); CNN’s Tailwind Tale: Inside Vietnam’s Last Great Myth (New York, 2003); and Hanoi Jane: War, Sex, and Fantasies of Betrayal (Amherst, MA, 2010). Lembcke is a Distinguished Lecturer of the Organization of American Historians. Kyle Longley is the Snell Family Dean’s Distinguished Professor of History and Political Science at Arizona State University. He is the author of six books and editor of two others, including works focusing on Vietnam such as Senator Albert Gore, Sr.: Tennessee Maverick (Baton Rouge, LA, 2004), Grunts: The American Combat Soldier in Vietnam (New York, 2008), The Morenci Marines: A Tale of a Small Town and the Vietnam War (Lawrence, KS, 2013) and LBJ’s 1968: Power, Politics, and the Presidency in America’s Year of Upheaval (Cambridge, UK, 2018), and the forthcoming co-authored, In Harm’s Way: A Military History of the United States (Oxford, UK, December 2018). Sean L. Malloy is an Associate Professor of History and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies (CRES) at the University of California, Merced. He is the author of Atomic Tragedy: Henry L. Stimson and the Decision to Use the Bomb Against Japan (Ithaca, NY, 2008) and, most recently, Out of Oakland: Black Panther Party Internationalism During the Cold War (Ithaca, NY, 2017). His current research project examines the battle in the United States over Boycott, Divestment, and Sanction (BDS), a response to the Israeli occupation of Palestine. Edwin A. Martini is Professor of History at Western Michigan University, where he currently serves as Associate Dean of Extended University Programs. He is the author and editor of several books, including Agent Orange: History, Science, and the Politics of Uncertainty (2012) and At War: The Military and American Culture in the Twentieth Century and Beyond (co-edited with David Kieran; 2018). David S. Painter teaches international history at Georgetown University. His publications include Oil and the American Century: The Political Economy of U.S. Foreign Oil Policy, 1941–1954; The Cold War: An International History; and Origins of the Cold War: An International History (co-edited with Melvyn P. Leffler); and articles on U.S. policy toward the Third World, U.S. oil policies, and the Cold War. Daniel J. Sargent is associate professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of A Superpower Transformed: The Remaking of American Foreign Relations in the 1970s (New York, 2015) and a co-editor of The Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective (Cambridge, MA, 2010). He is completing a textbook project on U.S. history in a global context, which will be published by W.W. Norton. He is presently working on an interpretive history of the American world order, from which this issue’s lecture is drawn. Katherine A. S. Sibley most recently edited A Companion to First Ladies (New York, 2016); her monographs include First Lady Florence Harding: Behind the Tragedy and Controversy (Lawrence, KS, 2009), Red Spies in America: Stolen Secrets and the Dawn of the Cold War (Lawrence, KS, 2004), and Loans and Legitimacy: The Evolution of Soviet-American Relations (Lexington, KY, 1996). In 2012, she guest-edited an issue of Diplomatic History on gender and sexuality. She serves on the executive committee of the Historians of American Communism, as well as the Historical Advisory Committee for the United States Department of State. Heather Marie Stur is General Buford Blount Professor of Military History at the University of Southern Mississippi and a fellow in USM’s Dale Center for the Study of War & Society. She is the author of Beyond Combat: Women and Gender in the Vietnam War Era (Cambridge, UK, 2011) and co-editor of Integrating the U.S. Military: Race, Gender, and Sexuality Since World War II (Baltimore, MD, 2017). She is currently writing two books: Saigon at War: South Vietnam and the Global Sixties(Cambridge, forthcoming) and Reflecting America: U.S. Military Expansion and Global Interventions (Praeger, forthcoming). Stur’s writing has appeared in publications including the New York Times,the National Interest, the Orange County Register, and Diplomatic History. Nu-Anh Tran is an assistant professor at the University of Connecticut. She holds a joint appointment in the History Department and the Asian and Asian American Studies Institute. She specializes in Vietnamese history, and her research interests include Vietnamese nationalism, the Vietnam War, and the Republic of Vietnam. Her review of The Vietnam War was originally presented at a panel discussion at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in 2017. Kara Dixon Vuic is the LCpl. Benjamin W. Schmidt Professor of War, Conflict, and Society in Twentieth-Century America at Texas Christian University and the author of The Girls Next Door: Bringing the Home Front to the Front Lines (Cambridge, MA, 2018, forthcoming) and Officer, Nurse, Woman: The Army Nurse Corps in the Vietnam War (Baltimore, MD, 2009). Jonathan Reed Winkler is professor and chair of the Department of History at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. He is the author of Nexus: Strategic Communications and American Security in World War I(Cambridge, MA, 2008). He contributed “Technology and the Environment in the Global Economy” to the second edition of America in the World: The Historiography of U.S. Foreign Relations since 1941 (Cambridge, UK, 2014). His current book project examines the strategic and diplomatic effort to place the United States at the center of the global communications network in the 20th century. Judy Tzu-Chun Wu is a professor and chair of the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. She authored Dr. Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: the Life of a Wartime Celebrity(Berkeley, CA, 2005) and Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era(Ithaca, NY, 2013). Her current book project, a collaboration with political scientist Gwendolyn Mink, explores the political career of Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color U.S. congressional representative and the co-sponsor of Title IX. Salim Yaqub is professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Director of UCSB’s Center for Cold War Studies and International History. He is the author of Containing Arab Nationalism: The Eisenhower Doctrine and the Middle East (Chapel Hill, NC, 2004) and several articles and book chapters on the history of U.S. foreign relations, the international politics of the Middle East, and Arab American political activism. His second book is Imperfect Strangers: Americans, Arabs, and U.S.-Middle East Relations in the 1970s (Ithaca, NY, 2016). © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Diplomatic HistoryOxford University Press

Published: May 7, 2018

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