Contributors

Contributors William Arighi (willarighi@gmail.com) received his doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Washington in 2015. He has taught world literature at the University of Washington and Northern Michigan University. He is currently working on a manuscript about the development of aesthetic discourse in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during the transition from Spanish to United States empires, as well as a project on how the melodramatic form structures narratives of migration. His work has appeared in English Language Notes, Comparative Literature Studies, and Hispanic Review. Maya Barzilai (brmaya@umich.edu) is an associate professor of Hebrew Literature and Jewish culture at the University of Michigan. Her book, Golem: Modern Wars and Their Monsters, was published by New York University Press in 2016. Her research areas include postwar Jewish literature (Hebrew, Yiddish, and German), American popular culture, and translation studies. Julie Burrell (j.m.burrell@csuohio.edu) is an assistant professor at Cleveland State University, where she teaches courses in African American literature and theatre. Her work has appeared in Continuum: The Journal of African Diaspora Drama, Theatre and Performance. She is at work on a book manuscript, Staging Freedom: The Civil Rights Theatre Movement in New York, 1939-1966, which traces black leftist theatre of the long civil rights era. Katie Daily (mary.daily-bruckner@usma.edu) is an assistant professor at the United States Military Academy (West Point). Her work examines the role of genre in contemporary writing, with a specific focus on the interaction between political climates and genre alterations in twenty-first-century American immigration narratives. Her manuscript, Who Am I With? Disaffiliation in Contemporary American Immigration Narratives, received the 2017 NeMLA Book Prize and is under contract with Palgrave Macmillan (forthcoming 2018). She holds both a BA and MA from Columbia University and a PhD from Boston College. Shilpa Davé (ssd5q@virginia.edu) is an assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and an assistant professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Indian Accents: Brown Voice and Racial Performance in American Television and Film (U of Illinois P, 2013) and coeditor of Global Asian American Popular Cultures (New York UP, 2016) and East Main Street: Asian American Popular Culture (New York UP, 2005). Her areas of expertise include Asian Americans and South Asians in the United States, and she teaches courses on race and gender, media culture, immigration narratives, and graphic novels. Jennifer Griffiths (jgriff02@nyit.edu) is the author of Traumatic Possessions: The Body and Memory in African American Women’s Writing and Performance (U of Virginia P, 2010) and has published work in literary trauma studies in Obsidian: Literature of the African Diaspora, Studies in the Novel, Contemporary Women’s Writing, and Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies. Her current book project focuses on representations of African American youth and the concept of “risk” in post-Civil Rights era performance and literature. She is currently an associate professor of English at New York Institute of Technology’s Manhattan campus. Renee Hudson (renee.hudson@gmail.com) is an assistant professor of Latina/o literature in the English department and an affiliated faculty member in the Latino Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Her research interests include form, revolution, and hemispheric studies. A former University of California Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, San Diego, she has published in Modern Fiction Studies and is currently at work on a project that considers the hemispheric role of revolution in shaping US literature. Long Le-Khac (le-khac@wustl.edu) is assistant professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis. His research and teaching interests include Asian American, Latina/o, and contemporary American literatures, comparative ethnic studies, narrative theory, and digital humanities. He is currently completing a book project, Transnarrative: Giving Form to Asian and Latina/o America. The book reveals the convergent histories and struggles of Asian Americans and Latina/os by tracing a shared aesthetic paradigm: an interlinked yet discontinuous transnarrative form that models the tensions these communities face as they navigate Cold War displacements, rapid stratification, and panethnic coalition building. His work has appeared in American Literature, Victorian Studies, and Canon/Archive: Studies in Quantitative Formalism from the Stanford Literary Lab. William Nessly (wnessly@wcupa.edu) is an associate professor of English at West Chester University, specializing in Asian American literature, transnational American studies, and postcolonial and narrative theory. His current book project reexamines Asian American fiction and drama through the historical context of Japan’s colonial empire (1895-1945), with a particular focus on intra-Asian conflict and the use of narrative form to symbolize colonial power relations. Nicholas T Rinehart (Rinehart@g.harvard.edu) is a doctoral candidate in English at Harvard University. His research has appeared in Callaloo, Journal of American Studies, Journal of Social History, ReVista, and Transition. He is also an editor, with Wai Chee Dimock et al., of American Literature in the World: An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler (Columbia UP, 2017). María Isabel Pérez Ramos (miperezramos@gmail.com) is an environmental humanities scholar whose research focuses on literary representations of environmental injustices. She has published her work in multidisciplinary academic journals such as Environmental Humanities, Ecozon@, and Resilience. She obtained her PhD in 2017 from the Environmental Humanities Laboratory (Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden), and is a member of the research group GIECO (Grupo de Investigación en Ecocrítica), Instituto Franklin, University of Alcalá de Henares. Her main academic interests are Chicana/o literature, water management, the US Southwest, and environmental justice. Matthew Smalley (mrsmalley3@fhsu.edu) is an assistant professor of English at Fort Hays State University, where he teaches courses in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature and culture. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Aethlon: The Journal of Sport Literature and Literature in the Early American Republic. His current book project examines how, across a long period of US literary history, authors have attempted to negotiate the contradictory affordances of literary preaching and how this vexed project has shaped and enabled US literary production. Alan Soldofsky (alan.soldofsky@sjsu.edu) is the author of the 2013 collection of poems, In the Buddha Factory (Truman State UP). With David Koehn, he is coeditor of Compendium: A Collection of Thoughts About Prosody, by Donald Justice (Omnidawn, 2017). He has also published three chapbooks: Kenora Station (Steam P, 1976), Staying Home (Steam P, 1977), and a chapbook that includes a selection of poems by his son, Adam Soldofsky, Holding Adam / My Father’s Books (Apple P, 2003). He is compiling an anthology of twentieth- and twenty-first-century global immigrant American poetry, titled From Somewhere Else. He is a professor of English and Director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at San José State University. Caroline H. Yang (chyang@umass.edu) is an assistant professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her research and teaching interests include Asian American and African American literatures, comparative race and ethnic studies, gender and sexuality studies, and transnational American studies. She is currently completing a book on the figure of the Chinese worker in US literature during and after Reconstruction. © MELUS: The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States Oxford University Press

Contributors

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Publisher
The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States
Copyright
© MELUS: The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0163-755X
eISSN
1946-3170
D.O.I.
10.1093/melus/mly015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

William Arighi (willarighi@gmail.com) received his doctorate in comparative literature from the University of Washington in 2015. He has taught world literature at the University of Washington and Northern Michigan University. He is currently working on a manuscript about the development of aesthetic discourse in the Philippines and Puerto Rico during the transition from Spanish to United States empires, as well as a project on how the melodramatic form structures narratives of migration. His work has appeared in English Language Notes, Comparative Literature Studies, and Hispanic Review. Maya Barzilai (brmaya@umich.edu) is an associate professor of Hebrew Literature and Jewish culture at the University of Michigan. Her book, Golem: Modern Wars and Their Monsters, was published by New York University Press in 2016. Her research areas include postwar Jewish literature (Hebrew, Yiddish, and German), American popular culture, and translation studies. Julie Burrell (j.m.burrell@csuohio.edu) is an assistant professor at Cleveland State University, where she teaches courses in African American literature and theatre. Her work has appeared in Continuum: The Journal of African Diaspora Drama, Theatre and Performance. She is at work on a book manuscript, Staging Freedom: The Civil Rights Theatre Movement in New York, 1939-1966, which traces black leftist theatre of the long civil rights era. Katie Daily (mary.daily-bruckner@usma.edu) is an assistant professor at the United States Military Academy (West Point). Her work examines the role of genre in contemporary writing, with a specific focus on the interaction between political climates and genre alterations in twenty-first-century American immigration narratives. Her manuscript, Who Am I With? Disaffiliation in Contemporary American Immigration Narratives, received the 2017 NeMLA Book Prize and is under contract with Palgrave Macmillan (forthcoming 2018). She holds both a BA and MA from Columbia University and a PhD from Boston College. Shilpa Davé (ssd5q@virginia.edu) is an assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and an assistant professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Indian Accents: Brown Voice and Racial Performance in American Television and Film (U of Illinois P, 2013) and coeditor of Global Asian American Popular Cultures (New York UP, 2016) and East Main Street: Asian American Popular Culture (New York UP, 2005). Her areas of expertise include Asian Americans and South Asians in the United States, and she teaches courses on race and gender, media culture, immigration narratives, and graphic novels. Jennifer Griffiths (jgriff02@nyit.edu) is the author of Traumatic Possessions: The Body and Memory in African American Women’s Writing and Performance (U of Virginia P, 2010) and has published work in literary trauma studies in Obsidian: Literature of the African Diaspora, Studies in the Novel, Contemporary Women’s Writing, and Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies. Her current book project focuses on representations of African American youth and the concept of “risk” in post-Civil Rights era performance and literature. She is currently an associate professor of English at New York Institute of Technology’s Manhattan campus. Renee Hudson (renee.hudson@gmail.com) is an assistant professor of Latina/o literature in the English department and an affiliated faculty member in the Latino Studies Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Her research interests include form, revolution, and hemispheric studies. A former University of California Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, San Diego, she has published in Modern Fiction Studies and is currently at work on a project that considers the hemispheric role of revolution in shaping US literature. Long Le-Khac (le-khac@wustl.edu) is assistant professor of English at Washington University in St. Louis. His research and teaching interests include Asian American, Latina/o, and contemporary American literatures, comparative ethnic studies, narrative theory, and digital humanities. He is currently completing a book project, Transnarrative: Giving Form to Asian and Latina/o America. The book reveals the convergent histories and struggles of Asian Americans and Latina/os by tracing a shared aesthetic paradigm: an interlinked yet discontinuous transnarrative form that models the tensions these communities face as they navigate Cold War displacements, rapid stratification, and panethnic coalition building. His work has appeared in American Literature, Victorian Studies, and Canon/Archive: Studies in Quantitative Formalism from the Stanford Literary Lab. William Nessly (wnessly@wcupa.edu) is an associate professor of English at West Chester University, specializing in Asian American literature, transnational American studies, and postcolonial and narrative theory. His current book project reexamines Asian American fiction and drama through the historical context of Japan’s colonial empire (1895-1945), with a particular focus on intra-Asian conflict and the use of narrative form to symbolize colonial power relations. Nicholas T Rinehart (Rinehart@g.harvard.edu) is a doctoral candidate in English at Harvard University. His research has appeared in Callaloo, Journal of American Studies, Journal of Social History, ReVista, and Transition. He is also an editor, with Wai Chee Dimock et al., of American Literature in the World: An Anthology from Anne Bradstreet to Octavia Butler (Columbia UP, 2017). María Isabel Pérez Ramos (miperezramos@gmail.com) is an environmental humanities scholar whose research focuses on literary representations of environmental injustices. She has published her work in multidisciplinary academic journals such as Environmental Humanities, Ecozon@, and Resilience. She obtained her PhD in 2017 from the Environmental Humanities Laboratory (Division of History of Science, Technology and Environment, at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden), and is a member of the research group GIECO (Grupo de Investigación en Ecocrítica), Instituto Franklin, University of Alcalá de Henares. Her main academic interests are Chicana/o literature, water management, the US Southwest, and environmental justice. Matthew Smalley (mrsmalley3@fhsu.edu) is an assistant professor of English at Fort Hays State University, where he teaches courses in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature and culture. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Aethlon: The Journal of Sport Literature and Literature in the Early American Republic. His current book project examines how, across a long period of US literary history, authors have attempted to negotiate the contradictory affordances of literary preaching and how this vexed project has shaped and enabled US literary production. Alan Soldofsky (alan.soldofsky@sjsu.edu) is the author of the 2013 collection of poems, In the Buddha Factory (Truman State UP). With David Koehn, he is coeditor of Compendium: A Collection of Thoughts About Prosody, by Donald Justice (Omnidawn, 2017). He has also published three chapbooks: Kenora Station (Steam P, 1976), Staying Home (Steam P, 1977), and a chapbook that includes a selection of poems by his son, Adam Soldofsky, Holding Adam / My Father’s Books (Apple P, 2003). He is compiling an anthology of twentieth- and twenty-first-century global immigrant American poetry, titled From Somewhere Else. He is a professor of English and Director of the MFA Program in Creative Writing at San José State University. Caroline H. Yang (chyang@umass.edu) is an assistant professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her research and teaching interests include Asian American and African American literatures, comparative race and ethnic studies, gender and sexuality studies, and transnational American studies. She is currently completing a book on the figure of the Chinese worker in US literature during and after Reconstruction. © MELUS: The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United StatesOxford University Press

Published: Jun 7, 2018

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