Contributors

Contributors Kathleen Anderson is a Professor of English at Palm Beach Atlantic University, where she specializes in women writers and writes creative nonfiction. She is the author of Jane Austen’s Women: An Introduction (forthcoming) and co-author of Jane Austen’s Guide to Thrift (2013), and her work has appeared many journals, including Persuasions: The Jane Austen Journal and Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal. She was Goucher College’s 2015–2016 Jane Austen Scholar-in-Residence. Stacey Balkan is an Assistant Professor in Environmental Literature and Humanities at Florida Atlantic University. Her teaching and research focus on postcolonial ecologies, landscape aesthetics and counter-pastoralism, and environmental justice. Recent articles for The Global South and Social Text Online investigate the material legacies of uneven and combined development in Nigeria and India. Her current book project, Rogues in the Postcolony: Developing Itineracy in India, studies picaresque critiques of enclosure and removal within colonial and postcolonial improvement regimes. Shiuhhuah Serena Chou is an Assistant Research Fellow at the Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. Her interests include organic farming literature and culture and Asian American environmental literature. Sarah Ensor is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, where she teaches in the Department of English and the Program in the Environment. Her book project—Spinster Ecology: Rethinking Relation in the American Literary Environment—considers how the figure of the spinster—and a spinsterly literary aesthetic—can help to identify and remedy the theoretical impasses dividing queer theory and ecocriticism. John R. Esperjesi is an Associate Professor of Literature at Kyung Hee University in Seoul, South Korea. He is the author of The Imperialist Imaginary: Visions of Asia and the Pacific in American Culture (2005) and is currently working on a new book on representations of the Korean War in the United States and diasporic Korean culture. His articles have appeared in journals such as Amerasia, Asian Studies Review, and boundary 2, among others. Julia Fiedorczuk is a Polish poet, prose writer, translator, and lecturer in American literature at Warsaw University. She has published six books of poetry, a collection of short stories, and two novels, as well as the critical work Ekopoetyka/Ecopoética/Ecopoetics (with Mexican poet and translator Gerardo Beltrán), focusing on ecological themes in contemporary Polish, German, American, and Mexican poetry. Bill Johnston’s English translation of her selected poems appeared in the United States in 2017. David Huebert is a doctoral candidate at Western University in Canada, where his research focuses on interspecies erotics in American literature. His articles have appeared in Cormac McCarthy Journal and Transgender Studies Quarterly, and he is the author of the short story collection Peninsula Sinking (2018). Angela Hume is an Assistant Professor of English, Creative Writing, and Environmental Literature at the University of Minnesota, Morris. She is a specialist in the intersection of twentieth- and twenty-first-century lyric poetry and environmental justice critique. Her scholarly work appears in journals such as Contemporary Literature, ISLE, and Jacket2, and she is a co-editor of the collection Ecopoetics: Essays in the Field (2018). Joan Latchaw is an Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska, where she teaches and publishes in rhetoric and composition, Ethnic-American literature, Jewish American writers, women and gender studies, and feminist rhetoric. Patrick Lawler, a Writer-in-Residence at LeMoyne College and Professor Emeritus at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, has published six books of poetry, including Feeding the Fear of the Earth and Underground. He wrote the script for the short eco-film Singing to the Earth Until a Tree Grows, and his books of fiction are Rescuers of Skydivers Search Among the Clouds and The Meaning of If. Christopher Leise is an Associate Professor of English at Whitman College. His most recent book is The Story upon a Hill: The Puritan Myth in Contemporary American Fiction (2017). He has also published articles in journals such as African American Review, MELUS, Philological Quarterly, and Studies in the Novel. Samia Rahimtoola is an Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary American Literature at Bowdoin College and has work forthcoming in No Place Like Home: New Essays in Ecopoetics. Kent C. Ryden is a Professor Emeritus of American and New England Studies at the University of Southern Maine, and is the author of three books—Mapping the Invisible Landscape: Folklore, Writing, and the Sense of Place; Landscape with Figures: Nature and Culture in New England; and Sum of the Parts: The Mathematics and Politics of Region, Place, and Writing—as well as many articles, chapters, and reviews on ecocriticism, regionalism, cultural geography, and the environmental humanities. He lives in Yarmouth, Maine. Catriona (Cate) Sandilands is a Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University, Toronto, Canada, and teaches in the environmental humanities. Although most of her recent work focuses on queer and feminist multispecies biopolitics, as a 2016 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow she is currently immersed in a collaborative creative writing project, “Storying Climate Change,” focused on Galiano Island, British Columbia. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment Oxford University Press

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1076-0962
eISSN
1759-1090
D.O.I.
10.1093/isle/isy021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Kathleen Anderson is a Professor of English at Palm Beach Atlantic University, where she specializes in women writers and writes creative nonfiction. She is the author of Jane Austen’s Women: An Introduction (forthcoming) and co-author of Jane Austen’s Guide to Thrift (2013), and her work has appeared many journals, including Persuasions: The Jane Austen Journal and Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal. She was Goucher College’s 2015–2016 Jane Austen Scholar-in-Residence. Stacey Balkan is an Assistant Professor in Environmental Literature and Humanities at Florida Atlantic University. Her teaching and research focus on postcolonial ecologies, landscape aesthetics and counter-pastoralism, and environmental justice. Recent articles for The Global South and Social Text Online investigate the material legacies of uneven and combined development in Nigeria and India. Her current book project, Rogues in the Postcolony: Developing Itineracy in India, studies picaresque critiques of enclosure and removal within colonial and postcolonial improvement regimes. Shiuhhuah Serena Chou is an Assistant Research Fellow at the Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica, Taiwan. Her interests include organic farming literature and culture and Asian American environmental literature. Sarah Ensor is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan, where she teaches in the Department of English and the Program in the Environment. Her book project—Spinster Ecology: Rethinking Relation in the American Literary Environment—considers how the figure of the spinster—and a spinsterly literary aesthetic—can help to identify and remedy the theoretical impasses dividing queer theory and ecocriticism. John R. Esperjesi is an Associate Professor of Literature at Kyung Hee University in Seoul, South Korea. He is the author of The Imperialist Imaginary: Visions of Asia and the Pacific in American Culture (2005) and is currently working on a new book on representations of the Korean War in the United States and diasporic Korean culture. His articles have appeared in journals such as Amerasia, Asian Studies Review, and boundary 2, among others. Julia Fiedorczuk is a Polish poet, prose writer, translator, and lecturer in American literature at Warsaw University. She has published six books of poetry, a collection of short stories, and two novels, as well as the critical work Ekopoetyka/Ecopoética/Ecopoetics (with Mexican poet and translator Gerardo Beltrán), focusing on ecological themes in contemporary Polish, German, American, and Mexican poetry. Bill Johnston’s English translation of her selected poems appeared in the United States in 2017. David Huebert is a doctoral candidate at Western University in Canada, where his research focuses on interspecies erotics in American literature. His articles have appeared in Cormac McCarthy Journal and Transgender Studies Quarterly, and he is the author of the short story collection Peninsula Sinking (2018). Angela Hume is an Assistant Professor of English, Creative Writing, and Environmental Literature at the University of Minnesota, Morris. She is a specialist in the intersection of twentieth- and twenty-first-century lyric poetry and environmental justice critique. Her scholarly work appears in journals such as Contemporary Literature, ISLE, and Jacket2, and she is a co-editor of the collection Ecopoetics: Essays in the Field (2018). Joan Latchaw is an Associate Professor at the University of Nebraska, where she teaches and publishes in rhetoric and composition, Ethnic-American literature, Jewish American writers, women and gender studies, and feminist rhetoric. Patrick Lawler, a Writer-in-Residence at LeMoyne College and Professor Emeritus at SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, has published six books of poetry, including Feeding the Fear of the Earth and Underground. He wrote the script for the short eco-film Singing to the Earth Until a Tree Grows, and his books of fiction are Rescuers of Skydivers Search Among the Clouds and The Meaning of If. Christopher Leise is an Associate Professor of English at Whitman College. His most recent book is The Story upon a Hill: The Puritan Myth in Contemporary American Fiction (2017). He has also published articles in journals such as African American Review, MELUS, Philological Quarterly, and Studies in the Novel. Samia Rahimtoola is an Assistant Professor of Modern and Contemporary American Literature at Bowdoin College and has work forthcoming in No Place Like Home: New Essays in Ecopoetics. Kent C. Ryden is a Professor Emeritus of American and New England Studies at the University of Southern Maine, and is the author of three books—Mapping the Invisible Landscape: Folklore, Writing, and the Sense of Place; Landscape with Figures: Nature and Culture in New England; and Sum of the Parts: The Mathematics and Politics of Region, Place, and Writing—as well as many articles, chapters, and reviews on ecocriticism, regionalism, cultural geography, and the environmental humanities. He lives in Yarmouth, Maine. Catriona (Cate) Sandilands is a Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University, Toronto, Canada, and teaches in the environmental humanities. Although most of her recent work focuses on queer and feminist multispecies biopolitics, as a 2016 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Fellow she is currently immersed in a collaborative creative writing project, “Storying Climate Change,” focused on Galiano Island, British Columbia. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and EnvironmentOxford University Press

Published: May 14, 2018

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