Contributors

Contributors Betsy A. Beasley is a member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ. She specializes in urban history, transnational labor, and international business in the twentieth century. Her current book project, Expert Capital: Houston and the Making of a Service Empire, traces Houston-based oilfield services executives who promoted a new ideology of American internationalism that envisioned the United States not as a center of manufacturing and production but as a white-collar headquarters serving the world through its provision of expertise. She cohosts and produces Who Makes Cents: A History of Capitalism Podcast with David Stein. Susan L. Carruthers is Professor of History at the University of Warwick, UK. Her recent publications include The Media at War (Basingstoke, UK, 2011) and The Good Occupation: American Soldiers and the Hazards of Peace (Cambridge, MA, 2016). Oliver Charbonneau completed a doctoral program in history at Western University in June 2016. His project, “Civilizational Imperatives: Americans, Moros, and the Colonial World,” examines four decades of U.S. rule in the Southern Philippines through an inter-imperial lens and is presently being revised for publication as a monograph. He teaches at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario, Canada in the School of Language and Liberal Studies. Paul W. Drake is Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Political Science, History, and International Relations at the University of California, San Diego. He also served as Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at UCSD and as President of the Latin American Studies Association. He is the sole author of three award-winning books: Socialism and Populism in Chile, The Money Doctor in the Andes (Champaign, IL, 1978), Labor Movements and Dictatorships (Baltimore, MD, 1996), and, most recently, Between Tyranny and Anarchy: A History of Democracy in Latin America, 1800–2006 (Stanford, CA, 2009). In addition, Drake has published seven anthologies and dozens of research articles. David Ekbladh is associate professor of history and core faculty in international relations at Tufts University. His is the author of The Great American Mission: Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order (Princeton, NJ, 2010), which won the Stuart L. Bernath Prize of the Society of American Historians and the Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award, as well as, with Thomas Zeiler and Benjamin Montoya, Beyond 1917: The United States and the Global Legacies of the Great War (New York, 2017). Tyler Esno received a PhD in History from Ohio University in 2017. In his dissertation, he argues that U.S. economic statecraft was one of the most effective means to wage the Cold War during its last decade. He is currently revising his dissertation into a book manuscript. Alex Ferguson is a PhD candidate in History at the University of Southampton. His thesis focuses on the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, analyzing the post’s influence on events on the ground and policy formation in Washington during the final four years of the Franco-Viet Minh War. He has presented his research at the SHAFR Annual Meeting, the Historians of the Twentieth Century (HOTCUS) Conference, and the British International History Group (BIHG) Conference. In 2014, he was awarded the HOTCUS Postgraduate Paper Prize for the best paper given by a postgraduate at their conference. Thomas C. Field Jr. is Associate Professor at the Embry-Riddle College of Security and Intelligence in Arizona. He is author of From Development to Dictatorship: Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era (Ithaca, NY, 2014), which won the McGann Book Award from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies. A Spanish-language edition was published in 2016 by the Bolivian Vice Presidency's Center for Social Research. Field previously received the Bernath Article Prize and the Unterberger Dissertation Prize, both from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. He is currently writing a book on the 1967 death of Ernesto “Che” Guevara in Bolivia and its impact on the Third World project. Sara Fieldston is an assistant professor of history at Seton Hall University. She is author of Raising the World: Child Welfare in the American Century (Cambridge, MA, 2015) and co-editor, with Susan Eckelmann Berghel and Paul Renfro, of Growing Up America: Youth and Politics since 1945 (under contract with University of Georgia Press). Eliga Gould is Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire. His most recent book is Among the Powers of the Earth: The American Revolution and the Making of a New World Empire (Cambridge, MA, 2012). He is currently writing a global history of the peace treaty that ended the American Revolutionary War. Gretchen Heefner is an Associate Professor at Northeastern University. She teaches and researches the history of the U.S. in the world, with a focus on the Cold War, militarization, and the surprisingly intimate relations between national security regimes and the everyday. She is the author of The Missile Next Door: The Minuteman in the America Heartland (Cambridge, MA, 2012) and is currently working on a project about military knowledge about extreme environments. Jonathan Reed Winkler is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Wright State University. He is the author of Nexus: Strategic Communications and American Security in World War I (Cambridge, MA, 2008), winner of the Paul Birdsall Prize of the American Historical Association. He was the Schorreck Memorial Lecturer at the National Security Agency in 2014. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diplomatic History Oxford University Press

Contributors

Diplomatic History , Volume 42 (2) – Apr 1, 2018

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0145-2096
eISSN
1467-7709
D.O.I.
10.1093/dh/dhy009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Betsy A. Beasley is a member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ. She specializes in urban history, transnational labor, and international business in the twentieth century. Her current book project, Expert Capital: Houston and the Making of a Service Empire, traces Houston-based oilfield services executives who promoted a new ideology of American internationalism that envisioned the United States not as a center of manufacturing and production but as a white-collar headquarters serving the world through its provision of expertise. She cohosts and produces Who Makes Cents: A History of Capitalism Podcast with David Stein. Susan L. Carruthers is Professor of History at the University of Warwick, UK. Her recent publications include The Media at War (Basingstoke, UK, 2011) and The Good Occupation: American Soldiers and the Hazards of Peace (Cambridge, MA, 2016). Oliver Charbonneau completed a doctoral program in history at Western University in June 2016. His project, “Civilizational Imperatives: Americans, Moros, and the Colonial World,” examines four decades of U.S. rule in the Southern Philippines through an inter-imperial lens and is presently being revised for publication as a monograph. He teaches at Fanshawe College in London, Ontario, Canada in the School of Language and Liberal Studies. Paul W. Drake is Distinguished Emeritus Professor of Political Science, History, and International Relations at the University of California, San Diego. He also served as Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at UCSD and as President of the Latin American Studies Association. He is the sole author of three award-winning books: Socialism and Populism in Chile, The Money Doctor in the Andes (Champaign, IL, 1978), Labor Movements and Dictatorships (Baltimore, MD, 1996), and, most recently, Between Tyranny and Anarchy: A History of Democracy in Latin America, 1800–2006 (Stanford, CA, 2009). In addition, Drake has published seven anthologies and dozens of research articles. David Ekbladh is associate professor of history and core faculty in international relations at Tufts University. His is the author of The Great American Mission: Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order (Princeton, NJ, 2010), which won the Stuart L. Bernath Prize of the Society of American Historians and the Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award, as well as, with Thomas Zeiler and Benjamin Montoya, Beyond 1917: The United States and the Global Legacies of the Great War (New York, 2017). Tyler Esno received a PhD in History from Ohio University in 2017. In his dissertation, he argues that U.S. economic statecraft was one of the most effective means to wage the Cold War during its last decade. He is currently revising his dissertation into a book manuscript. Alex Ferguson is a PhD candidate in History at the University of Southampton. His thesis focuses on the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, analyzing the post’s influence on events on the ground and policy formation in Washington during the final four years of the Franco-Viet Minh War. He has presented his research at the SHAFR Annual Meeting, the Historians of the Twentieth Century (HOTCUS) Conference, and the British International History Group (BIHG) Conference. In 2014, he was awarded the HOTCUS Postgraduate Paper Prize for the best paper given by a postgraduate at their conference. Thomas C. Field Jr. is Associate Professor at the Embry-Riddle College of Security and Intelligence in Arizona. He is author of From Development to Dictatorship: Bolivia and the Alliance for Progress in the Kennedy Era (Ithaca, NY, 2014), which won the McGann Book Award from the Rocky Mountain Council for Latin American Studies. A Spanish-language edition was published in 2016 by the Bolivian Vice Presidency's Center for Social Research. Field previously received the Bernath Article Prize and the Unterberger Dissertation Prize, both from the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. He is currently writing a book on the 1967 death of Ernesto “Che” Guevara in Bolivia and its impact on the Third World project. Sara Fieldston is an assistant professor of history at Seton Hall University. She is author of Raising the World: Child Welfare in the American Century (Cambridge, MA, 2015) and co-editor, with Susan Eckelmann Berghel and Paul Renfro, of Growing Up America: Youth and Politics since 1945 (under contract with University of Georgia Press). Eliga Gould is Professor of History at the University of New Hampshire. His most recent book is Among the Powers of the Earth: The American Revolution and the Making of a New World Empire (Cambridge, MA, 2012). He is currently writing a global history of the peace treaty that ended the American Revolutionary War. Gretchen Heefner is an Associate Professor at Northeastern University. She teaches and researches the history of the U.S. in the world, with a focus on the Cold War, militarization, and the surprisingly intimate relations between national security regimes and the everyday. She is the author of The Missile Next Door: The Minuteman in the America Heartland (Cambridge, MA, 2012) and is currently working on a project about military knowledge about extreme environments. Jonathan Reed Winkler is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Wright State University. He is the author of Nexus: Strategic Communications and American Security in World War I (Cambridge, MA, 2008), winner of the Paul Birdsall Prize of the American Historical Association. He was the Schorreck Memorial Lecturer at the National Security Agency in 2014. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

Journal

Diplomatic HistoryOxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2018

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