Contribution of Smoking to Tuberculosis Incidence and Mortality in High Tuberculosis Burden Countries

Contribution of Smoking to Tuberculosis Incidence and Mortality in High Tuberculosis Burden... Abstract Globally, 10 million incident tuberculosis (TB) cases are reported annually; 95% of TB cases and 80% of tobacco users reside in low- and middle-income countries. Smoking approximately doubles the risk of TB disease and TB mortality. We estimated the proportion of annual incident TB cases and TB mortality attributable to tobacco smoking in 32 high TB burden countries. We obtained country-specific estimates of TB incidence, TB mortality, and smoking prevalence from the World Health Organization Global TB Report (2017), tobacco surveillance reports (2015), and the Tobacco Atlas. Risk ratios for the effect of smoking on TB incidence and TB mortality were obtained from published meta-analyses. An estimated 17.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.4, 21.4) of TB cases and 15.2% (95% CI: 1.8, 31.9) of TB mortality were attributable to smoking. Among high TB burden countries, Russia had the highest proportion of smoking-attributable TB disease (31.6%, 95% CI: 15.9, 37.6) and deaths (28.1%, 95% CI: 3.8, 51.4). Men (30.3%, 95% CI: 14.7, 36.6) had a greater proportion of TB cases attributable to smoking than women (4.3, 95% CI: 1.7, 5.7). Our findings highlight the need for tobacco control in high TB burden countries to combat TB incidence and TB mortality. Population Attributable Fraction, Tuberculosis, Tobacco © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Epidemiology Oxford University Press

Contribution of Smoking to Tuberculosis Incidence and Mortality in High Tuberculosis Burden Countries

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
0002-9262
eISSN
1476-6256
D.O.I.
10.1093/aje/kwy081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Globally, 10 million incident tuberculosis (TB) cases are reported annually; 95% of TB cases and 80% of tobacco users reside in low- and middle-income countries. Smoking approximately doubles the risk of TB disease and TB mortality. We estimated the proportion of annual incident TB cases and TB mortality attributable to tobacco smoking in 32 high TB burden countries. We obtained country-specific estimates of TB incidence, TB mortality, and smoking prevalence from the World Health Organization Global TB Report (2017), tobacco surveillance reports (2015), and the Tobacco Atlas. Risk ratios for the effect of smoking on TB incidence and TB mortality were obtained from published meta-analyses. An estimated 17.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.4, 21.4) of TB cases and 15.2% (95% CI: 1.8, 31.9) of TB mortality were attributable to smoking. Among high TB burden countries, Russia had the highest proportion of smoking-attributable TB disease (31.6%, 95% CI: 15.9, 37.6) and deaths (28.1%, 95% CI: 3.8, 51.4). Men (30.3%, 95% CI: 14.7, 36.6) had a greater proportion of TB cases attributable to smoking than women (4.3, 95% CI: 1.7, 5.7). Our findings highlight the need for tobacco control in high TB burden countries to combat TB incidence and TB mortality. Population Attributable Fraction, Tuberculosis, Tobacco © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

American Journal of EpidemiologyOxford University Press

Published: Apr 7, 2018

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