Comparison of 68Ga PET/CT to other imaging studies in Medullary Thyroid Cancer: superiority in detecting bone metastases

Comparison of 68Ga PET/CT to other imaging studies in Medullary Thyroid Cancer: superiority in... Abstract Persistent disease after surgery is common in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) requiring lifelong radiological surveillance. Staging work-up includes imaging of neck, chest, abdomen and bones. A study integrating all sites would be ideal. Despite the established use of 68Ga PET/CT with somatostatin analogs in most neuroendocrine tumors, in MTC its efficacy is controversial. Objective Evaluate the efficacy of 68Ga PET/CT in detecting MTC lesions and evaluate tumor expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) associating with 68Ga PET/CT findings. Methods Prospective study evaluating 30 MTC patients; Group 1 (N=16): Biochemical disease and Group 2 (N=14): Metastatic disease. Patients underwent 68Ga PET/CT, bone scan, neck CT and US, CT chest, CT/MRI abdomen, MRI spine. 68Ga PET/CT findings were analyzed by disease site as positive or negative and as concordant or discordant with conventional studies. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using pathological, cytological analysis or unequivocal identification by standard imaging studies. Immunohistochemical analysis of SSTRs were compared with 68Ga PET/CT findings. Results In both groups 68Ga PET/CT was inferior than currently used imaging studies except for bone scan. In group 2, 68Ga PET/CT sensitivities were 56%, 57% and 9% for detecting neck lymph nodes, lung and liver metastases and 100% for bone metastases, superior than bone scan (44%). Expression of SSTRs, observed in 44% of tumors, was not associated with68Ga DOTATATE uptake. Conclusions 68Ga PET/CT does not provide optimal whole-body imaging as a single procedure in patients with MTC. However, is highly sensitive detecting bone lesions and could substitute bone scan and MRI. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism Oxford University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/comparison-of-68ga-pet-ct-to-other-imaging-studies-in-medullary-IaAd8Gq4gm
Publisher
Endocrine Society
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society
ISSN
0021-972X
eISSN
1945-7197
D.O.I.
10.1210/jc.2018-00193
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Persistent disease after surgery is common in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) requiring lifelong radiological surveillance. Staging work-up includes imaging of neck, chest, abdomen and bones. A study integrating all sites would be ideal. Despite the established use of 68Ga PET/CT with somatostatin analogs in most neuroendocrine tumors, in MTC its efficacy is controversial. Objective Evaluate the efficacy of 68Ga PET/CT in detecting MTC lesions and evaluate tumor expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) associating with 68Ga PET/CT findings. Methods Prospective study evaluating 30 MTC patients; Group 1 (N=16): Biochemical disease and Group 2 (N=14): Metastatic disease. Patients underwent 68Ga PET/CT, bone scan, neck CT and US, CT chest, CT/MRI abdomen, MRI spine. 68Ga PET/CT findings were analyzed by disease site as positive or negative and as concordant or discordant with conventional studies. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using pathological, cytological analysis or unequivocal identification by standard imaging studies. Immunohistochemical analysis of SSTRs were compared with 68Ga PET/CT findings. Results In both groups 68Ga PET/CT was inferior than currently used imaging studies except for bone scan. In group 2, 68Ga PET/CT sensitivities were 56%, 57% and 9% for detecting neck lymph nodes, lung and liver metastases and 100% for bone metastases, superior than bone scan (44%). Expression of SSTRs, observed in 44% of tumors, was not associated with68Ga DOTATATE uptake. Conclusions 68Ga PET/CT does not provide optimal whole-body imaging as a single procedure in patients with MTC. However, is highly sensitive detecting bone lesions and could substitute bone scan and MRI. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society

Journal

Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and MetabolismOxford University Press

Published: May 28, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off