Comments on “Plastic Surgery-Related Hashtag Utilization on Instagram: Implications for Education and Marketing”

Comments on “Plastic Surgery-Related Hashtag Utilization on Instagram: Implications for... On behalf of the 19,000 members of the American Academy of Dermatology, I am writing to express concern regarding the recent study by Dorfman et al related to plastic and cosmetic surgery hashtags on Instagram.1 While the results of this study are informative, the presentation of those results and the conclusions of the authors are misleading in implying that board-certified dermatologists are not qualified to perform cosmetic surgical procedures. The hashtags investigated by the authors include a range of general and specific terms that relate to both plastic surgery and cosmetic surgery procedures. As only 9 posts were indicated to be from dermatologists, and further data as to the nature of these posts are not provided, the authors’ conclusions regarding the specialty of dermatology are unsupported. Several cosmetic procedures, including liposuction, injection of botulinum toxin or soft-tissue fillers, and laser resurfacing, are safely and effectively used by dermatologists in the office setting.2,3 Further, the specialty of dermatology has contributed significantly to the advancement of cosmetic surgery to the benefit of multiple medical specialties, and dermatologists continue to innovate and lead clinical trials in new injectable, laser, and energy-based cosmetic procedures.3 The American Academy of Dermatology agrees that it is important for patients undergoing cosmetic procedures to receive care from a trained, board-certified physician. While we appreciate the attention this study brings to this issue, it is misleading to suggest that cosmetic surgery provided by dermatologists is inappropriate or would lead to poor patient outcomes. As experts in the medical and surgical treatment of skin, hair and nails, dermatologists certified by the American Board of Dermatology or the American Osteopathic Board of Dermatology have the education, training, and experience to safely perform cosmetic surgery and provide excellent results for patients. Current ACGME (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education) Program Requirements for Graduate Medical Education in Dermatology require residency training in cosmetic techniques including liposuction, scar revision, laser resurfacing, hair transplants, invasive vein therapies, botulinum toxin injections, and soft-tissue augmentation.4 We agree with the authors that not all individuals offering cosmetic procedures are qualified to do so, despite claims to the contrary. In fact, dermatologists are often called to care for patients who experience negative results when unqualified providers attempt these procedures. We suggest the data from this study support the importance of patients first considering a board-certified physician, and then further investigating a doctor’s training, credentials, and experience before deciding if a particular physician is the right choice for them. Cosmetic surgery is practiced by physicians from a number of medical specialties; the outcome of any cosmetic procedure ultimately depends on the skill and experience of the healthcare provider. Unfortunately, the presentation of this study’s findings misrepresents the qualifications of board-certified dermatologists as providers of cosmetic surgery. Disclosures The author declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The author received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. REFERENCES 1. Dorfman RG , Vaca EE , Mahmood E , Fine NA , Schierle CF . Plastic surgery-related hashtag utilization on instagram: implications for education and marketing . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 3 ): 332 - 338 . 2. Starling J III , Thosani MK , Coldiron BM . Determining the safety of office-based surgery: what 10 years of Florida data and 6 years of Alabama data reveal . Dermatol Surg . 2012 ; 38 ( 2 ): 171 - 177 . 3. Hanke CW , Moy RL , Roenigk RK , et al. Current status of surgery in dermatology . J Am Acad Dermatol . 2013 ; 69 ( 6 ): 972 - 1001 . 4. Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education . http://www.acgme.org/Specialties/Program-Requirements-and-FAQs-and-Applications/pfcatid/3/Dermatology. Accessed October 26 2017 . © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

Comments on “Plastic Surgery-Related Hashtag Utilization on Instagram: Implications for Education and Marketing”

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/comments-on-plastic-surgery-related-hashtag-utilization-on-instagram-crkjWoiCZ6
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
eISSN
1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjx228
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On behalf of the 19,000 members of the American Academy of Dermatology, I am writing to express concern regarding the recent study by Dorfman et al related to plastic and cosmetic surgery hashtags on Instagram.1 While the results of this study are informative, the presentation of those results and the conclusions of the authors are misleading in implying that board-certified dermatologists are not qualified to perform cosmetic surgical procedures. The hashtags investigated by the authors include a range of general and specific terms that relate to both plastic surgery and cosmetic surgery procedures. As only 9 posts were indicated to be from dermatologists, and further data as to the nature of these posts are not provided, the authors’ conclusions regarding the specialty of dermatology are unsupported. Several cosmetic procedures, including liposuction, injection of botulinum toxin or soft-tissue fillers, and laser resurfacing, are safely and effectively used by dermatologists in the office setting.2,3 Further, the specialty of dermatology has contributed significantly to the advancement of cosmetic surgery to the benefit of multiple medical specialties, and dermatologists continue to innovate and lead clinical trials in new injectable, laser, and energy-based cosmetic procedures.3 The American Academy of Dermatology agrees that it is important for patients undergoing cosmetic procedures to receive care from a trained, board-certified physician. While we appreciate the attention this study brings to this issue, it is misleading to suggest that cosmetic surgery provided by dermatologists is inappropriate or would lead to poor patient outcomes. As experts in the medical and surgical treatment of skin, hair and nails, dermatologists certified by the American Board of Dermatology or the American Osteopathic Board of Dermatology have the education, training, and experience to safely perform cosmetic surgery and provide excellent results for patients. Current ACGME (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education) Program Requirements for Graduate Medical Education in Dermatology require residency training in cosmetic techniques including liposuction, scar revision, laser resurfacing, hair transplants, invasive vein therapies, botulinum toxin injections, and soft-tissue augmentation.4 We agree with the authors that not all individuals offering cosmetic procedures are qualified to do so, despite claims to the contrary. In fact, dermatologists are often called to care for patients who experience negative results when unqualified providers attempt these procedures. We suggest the data from this study support the importance of patients first considering a board-certified physician, and then further investigating a doctor’s training, credentials, and experience before deciding if a particular physician is the right choice for them. Cosmetic surgery is practiced by physicians from a number of medical specialties; the outcome of any cosmetic procedure ultimately depends on the skill and experience of the healthcare provider. Unfortunately, the presentation of this study’s findings misrepresents the qualifications of board-certified dermatologists as providers of cosmetic surgery. Disclosures The author declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The author received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. REFERENCES 1. Dorfman RG , Vaca EE , Mahmood E , Fine NA , Schierle CF . Plastic surgery-related hashtag utilization on instagram: implications for education and marketing . Aesthet Surg J . 2018 ; 38 ( 3 ): 332 - 338 . 2. Starling J III , Thosani MK , Coldiron BM . Determining the safety of office-based surgery: what 10 years of Florida data and 6 years of Alabama data reveal . Dermatol Surg . 2012 ; 38 ( 2 ): 171 - 177 . 3. Hanke CW , Moy RL , Roenigk RK , et al. Current status of surgery in dermatology . J Am Acad Dermatol . 2013 ; 69 ( 6 ): 972 - 1001 . 4. Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education . http://www.acgme.org/Specialties/Program-Requirements-and-FAQs-and-Applications/pfcatid/3/Dermatology. Accessed October 26 2017 . © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model)

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: Jun 6, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off