Comments on “Added Healthcare Charges Conferred by Smoking in Outpatient Plastic Surgery”

Comments on “Added Healthcare Charges Conferred by Smoking in Outpatient Plastic Surgery” Letter to the Editor Aesthetic Surgery Journal 2018, 1–1 Comments on “Added Healthcare Charges © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: Conferred by Smoking in Outpatient Plastic journals.permissions@oup.com DOI: 10.1093/asj/sjy058 Surgery” www.aestheticsurgeryjournal.com Mark C. Kendall, MD; and Lucas J. Castro-Alves, MD Editorial Decision date: February 16, 2018. We read with great interest the article of Sieffert and Funding colleagues in a recent issue of the journal. The authors The authors received no financial support for the research, performed a retrospective study on 214,761 patients authorship, and publication of this article. undergoing outpatient plastic surgery and concluded that patients undergoing common outpatient plastic surgery REFERENCES procedures who have a history of smoking are at risk for 1. Sieffert MR, Johnson RM, Fox JP. Added healthcare more frequent complications, and incur higher healthcare charges conferred by smoking in outpatient plastic sur- charges than patients who are nonsmokers. The authors gery. Aesthet Surg J. 2018 Jan 31. doi: 10.1093/asj/sjx231. should be congratulated for performing a well-designed [Epub ahead of print] study on an important topic (eg, complications) in patients 2. Teunkens A, Vanhaecht K, Vermeulen K, et al. Measuring 2,3 undergoing outpatient surgery. In addition, the current satisfaction and anesthesia related outcomes in a surgical emphasis on the need to improve the quality of care and day care centre: A three-year single-centre observational reduce costs after surgery make the topic very relevant in study. J Clin Anesth. 2017;43:15-23. 4,5 perioperative medicine. 3. Sforza M, Husein R, Atkinson C, Zaccheddu R. Unraveling Although the study of Sieffert et al was well conducted, factors influencing early seroma formation in breast aug- mentation surgery. Aesthet Surg J. 2017;37(3):301-307. there are some concerns regarding the study that need to be 4. Oh J, Perlas A, Lau J, Gandhi R, Chan VW. Functional clarified by the authors. First, the authors did not control for outcome and cost-effectiveness of outpatient vs inpatient surgical duration which has been strongly associated with 6 care for complex hind-foot and ankle surgery. A retro- poor outcomes following ambulatory surgery. Secondly, the spective cohort study. J Clin Anesth. 2016;35:20-25. authors did not provide a correlation analysis for the variables 5. Schonberger RB, Dai F, Brandt C, Burg MM. The effect of included in their statistical model and they did not provide race on postsurgical ambulatory medical follow-up among the calibration for the model. Lastly, it would be important United States Veterans. J Clin Anesth. 2017;40:55-61. to evaluate if patients who stopped smoking prior to surgery 6. De Oliveira GS Jr, McCarthy RJ, Davignon K, Chen H, experienced better outcomes than those patients who did not Panaro H, Cioffi WG. Predictors of 30-day pulmonary as this can be used as a smoking cessation strategy. complications after outpatient surgery: relative impor- We would welcome some comments to address the tance of body mass index weight classifications in risk assessment. J Am Coll Surg. 2017;225(2):312-323.e7. aforementioned issues as they were not discussed by the authors. This would help to further support the findings of From the Department of Anesthesiology, Rhode Island Hospital, this important study. Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI. Disclosures Corresponding Author: Dr Mark C. Kendall, Director of Clinical Research, Department of The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with Anesthesiology, Warren Alpert Medical School Brown University, 593 respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA. article. E-mail: mark.kendall@lifespan.org Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/asj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/asj/sjy058/5001938 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 07 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

Comments on “Added Healthcare Charges Conferred by Smoking in Outpatient Plastic Surgery”

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Oxford University Press
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
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1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjy058
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Abstract

Letter to the Editor Aesthetic Surgery Journal 2018, 1–1 Comments on “Added Healthcare Charges © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: Conferred by Smoking in Outpatient Plastic journals.permissions@oup.com DOI: 10.1093/asj/sjy058 Surgery” www.aestheticsurgeryjournal.com Mark C. Kendall, MD; and Lucas J. Castro-Alves, MD Editorial Decision date: February 16, 2018. We read with great interest the article of Sieffert and Funding colleagues in a recent issue of the journal. The authors The authors received no financial support for the research, performed a retrospective study on 214,761 patients authorship, and publication of this article. undergoing outpatient plastic surgery and concluded that patients undergoing common outpatient plastic surgery REFERENCES procedures who have a history of smoking are at risk for 1. Sieffert MR, Johnson RM, Fox JP. Added healthcare more frequent complications, and incur higher healthcare charges conferred by smoking in outpatient plastic sur- charges than patients who are nonsmokers. The authors gery. Aesthet Surg J. 2018 Jan 31. doi: 10.1093/asj/sjx231. should be congratulated for performing a well-designed [Epub ahead of print] study on an important topic (eg, complications) in patients 2. Teunkens A, Vanhaecht K, Vermeulen K, et al. Measuring 2,3 undergoing outpatient surgery. In addition, the current satisfaction and anesthesia related outcomes in a surgical emphasis on the need to improve the quality of care and day care centre: A three-year single-centre observational reduce costs after surgery make the topic very relevant in study. J Clin Anesth. 2017;43:15-23. 4,5 perioperative medicine. 3. Sforza M, Husein R, Atkinson C, Zaccheddu R. Unraveling Although the study of Sieffert et al was well conducted, factors influencing early seroma formation in breast aug- mentation surgery. Aesthet Surg J. 2017;37(3):301-307. there are some concerns regarding the study that need to be 4. Oh J, Perlas A, Lau J, Gandhi R, Chan VW. Functional clarified by the authors. First, the authors did not control for outcome and cost-effectiveness of outpatient vs inpatient surgical duration which has been strongly associated with 6 care for complex hind-foot and ankle surgery. A retro- poor outcomes following ambulatory surgery. Secondly, the spective cohort study. J Clin Anesth. 2016;35:20-25. authors did not provide a correlation analysis for the variables 5. Schonberger RB, Dai F, Brandt C, Burg MM. The effect of included in their statistical model and they did not provide race on postsurgical ambulatory medical follow-up among the calibration for the model. Lastly, it would be important United States Veterans. J Clin Anesth. 2017;40:55-61. to evaluate if patients who stopped smoking prior to surgery 6. De Oliveira GS Jr, McCarthy RJ, Davignon K, Chen H, experienced better outcomes than those patients who did not Panaro H, Cioffi WG. Predictors of 30-day pulmonary as this can be used as a smoking cessation strategy. complications after outpatient surgery: relative impor- We would welcome some comments to address the tance of body mass index weight classifications in risk assessment. J Am Coll Surg. 2017;225(2):312-323.e7. aforementioned issues as they were not discussed by the authors. This would help to further support the findings of From the Department of Anesthesiology, Rhode Island Hospital, this important study. Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI. Disclosures Corresponding Author: Dr Mark C. Kendall, Director of Clinical Research, Department of The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with Anesthesiology, Warren Alpert Medical School Brown University, 593 respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this Eddy Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA. article. E-mail: mark.kendall@lifespan.org Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/asj/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/asj/sjy058/5001938 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 07 June 2018

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: May 23, 2018

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