Commentary on: Assessing the Value of a Multimedia-Based Aesthetic Curriculum in Plastic Surgery Residency: A Single-Center Pilot Study

Commentary on: Assessing the Value of a Multimedia-Based Aesthetic Curriculum in Plastic Surgery... In their pilot study, David et al present the impact of an 8-week multimedia-based aesthetic curriculum at a single institution using journal articles and the RADAR education resource sponsored by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS).1 All residents except the senior author were included. Pre- and post-intervention surveys evaluated the impact of the learning modules on resident perspectives and confidence. The authors found significant increases in confidence with performing procedures and a high level of interest in incorporating such a learning module in their residency. Plastic surgery is known for being the field of creativity and innovation, and it should come as no surprise that plastic surgery education is staying at the forefront of advances of surgical education with new technologies such as RADAR. Other advances include surgical simulation, video analysis, and decision-making tools.2 As the authors astutely note, the Halstedian model of surgical education with direct patient care and participation in surgery is the most effective way to instill competence in trainees—and this is the premise for modern plastic surgery residency and ASAPS aesthetic fellowships.3 But as more programs move towards an integrated model of training with less general surgery and more dedicated plastic surgery time, educators will need to develop new and innovative ways to train residents in a graduated way. The pilot study is a great example of how a simple, thoughtful curriculum can help meet shortcomings in a training program’s curriculum. The authors point out that the average time spent by residents in this study on an aesthetic surgery rotation was 1.65 months with a median of 0 months. Based on the distribution of aesthetic procedures and numbers performed, the majority of residents in the pilot study has not spent a significant amount of time actually doing clinical aesthetic surgery. Hence, the findings of the study—that such a multimedia module is interesting and effective—may be true for more junior residents, as the authors also show the more senior residents, who have done more aesthetic surgery, are more confident. Variability in aesthetic surgery exposure across training programs and access to resident cosmetic clinics, for example, will impact the generalizability of such a module and how it could be received at other programs. Graduated responsibility with surgical and nonsurgical procedures has been described elsewhere.4–6 It is unclear how much the time span was between module conclusion and procedures performed that led to increased confidence with aesthetic procedures. It seems intuitive that preparation for cases would enhance confidence in the operating room. The authors point out that the curriculum was a single 8-week intervention, and it is unclear how the module could be formally integrated into the residency curriculum. One could imagine that the same module repeated over 6 years could have diminishing levels of interest and return on time invested. This brings up one of the biggest challenges in aesthetic surgery education: how do we as educators in academic centers, ASAPS, and this prestigious journal provide learners with content that is relevant, current, interesting, and also presented in a novel way? As the study suggests, plastic surgery residents cannot be “lumped” into one big cohort with uniform educational levels and needs. We would argue that it would be akin to making the mistake of assuming that the competency and confidence of a plastic surgeon in his or her first year of practice would be the same as one who nears retirement. Gaps in knowledge evolve and change not just with progression in career, but also with the advent of new technologies and advances in the issues we address as plastic surgeons. Social media have become powerful tools for dissemination of information; accessibility and immediacy of content have never been greater. RADAR has been a one such platform to help bridge the gap for many academic institutions, as seen in this pilot study and at our own institution. But, patients and even practicing plastic surgeons increasingly turn to platforms such as Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for educational content. Videos and advanced multimedia such as virtual reality and simulation are the evolution of text and simple 2D photographs. The challenge for us will be to develop rich, high-quality educational content that is readily accessible and level appropriate for all plastic surgeons in training or in practice. We applaud the authors, ASAPS, and the Aesthetic Surgery Journal for relentless efforts to develop and advance the highest levels of aesthetic surgery education. Disclosures The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. REFERENCES 1. David JA, Rifkin WJ, Saadeh PB, Sinno S. Assessing the value of a multimedia-based aesthetic curriculum in plastic surgery residency: a single-center pilot study. Aesthet Surg J . 2018. doi: 10.1093/asj/sjy110. [Epub ahead of print] 2. Khansa I, Janis JE. Maximizing technological resources in plastic surgery resident education. J Craniofac Surg . 2015; 26( 8): 2264- 2269. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  3. Linder SA, Mele JA3rd, Capozzi A. Teaching aesthetic surgery at the resident level. Aesthetic Plast Surg . 1996; 20( 4): 351- 354. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  4. Qureshi AA, Parikh RP, Myckatyn TM, Tenenbaum MM. Resident cosmetic clinic: practice patterns, safety, and outcomes at an academic plastic surgery institution. Aesthet Surg J . 2016; 36( 9): NP273- NP280. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  5. Weissler JM, Carney MJ, Yan C, Percec I. The value of a resident aesthetic clinic: a 7-year institutional review and survey of the chief resident experience. Aesthet Surg J . 2017; 37( 10): 1188- 1198. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  6. Qureshi AA, Parikh RP, Sharma K, Myckatyn TM, Tenenbaum MM. Nonsurgical facial rejuvenation: outcomes and safety of neuromodulator and soft-tissue filler procedures performed in a resident cosmetic clinic. Aesthetic Plast Surg . 2017; 41( 5): 1177- 1183. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aesthetic Surgery Journal Oxford University Press

Commentary on: Assessing the Value of a Multimedia-Based Aesthetic Curriculum in Plastic Surgery Residency: A Single-Center Pilot Study

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Publisher
Mosby Inc.
Copyright
© 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com
ISSN
1090-820X
eISSN
1527-330X
D.O.I.
10.1093/asj/sjy112
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Abstract

In their pilot study, David et al present the impact of an 8-week multimedia-based aesthetic curriculum at a single institution using journal articles and the RADAR education resource sponsored by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS).1 All residents except the senior author were included. Pre- and post-intervention surveys evaluated the impact of the learning modules on resident perspectives and confidence. The authors found significant increases in confidence with performing procedures and a high level of interest in incorporating such a learning module in their residency. Plastic surgery is known for being the field of creativity and innovation, and it should come as no surprise that plastic surgery education is staying at the forefront of advances of surgical education with new technologies such as RADAR. Other advances include surgical simulation, video analysis, and decision-making tools.2 As the authors astutely note, the Halstedian model of surgical education with direct patient care and participation in surgery is the most effective way to instill competence in trainees—and this is the premise for modern plastic surgery residency and ASAPS aesthetic fellowships.3 But as more programs move towards an integrated model of training with less general surgery and more dedicated plastic surgery time, educators will need to develop new and innovative ways to train residents in a graduated way. The pilot study is a great example of how a simple, thoughtful curriculum can help meet shortcomings in a training program’s curriculum. The authors point out that the average time spent by residents in this study on an aesthetic surgery rotation was 1.65 months with a median of 0 months. Based on the distribution of aesthetic procedures and numbers performed, the majority of residents in the pilot study has not spent a significant amount of time actually doing clinical aesthetic surgery. Hence, the findings of the study—that such a multimedia module is interesting and effective—may be true for more junior residents, as the authors also show the more senior residents, who have done more aesthetic surgery, are more confident. Variability in aesthetic surgery exposure across training programs and access to resident cosmetic clinics, for example, will impact the generalizability of such a module and how it could be received at other programs. Graduated responsibility with surgical and nonsurgical procedures has been described elsewhere.4–6 It is unclear how much the time span was between module conclusion and procedures performed that led to increased confidence with aesthetic procedures. It seems intuitive that preparation for cases would enhance confidence in the operating room. The authors point out that the curriculum was a single 8-week intervention, and it is unclear how the module could be formally integrated into the residency curriculum. One could imagine that the same module repeated over 6 years could have diminishing levels of interest and return on time invested. This brings up one of the biggest challenges in aesthetic surgery education: how do we as educators in academic centers, ASAPS, and this prestigious journal provide learners with content that is relevant, current, interesting, and also presented in a novel way? As the study suggests, plastic surgery residents cannot be “lumped” into one big cohort with uniform educational levels and needs. We would argue that it would be akin to making the mistake of assuming that the competency and confidence of a plastic surgeon in his or her first year of practice would be the same as one who nears retirement. Gaps in knowledge evolve and change not just with progression in career, but also with the advent of new technologies and advances in the issues we address as plastic surgeons. Social media have become powerful tools for dissemination of information; accessibility and immediacy of content have never been greater. RADAR has been a one such platform to help bridge the gap for many academic institutions, as seen in this pilot study and at our own institution. But, patients and even practicing plastic surgeons increasingly turn to platforms such as Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook for educational content. Videos and advanced multimedia such as virtual reality and simulation are the evolution of text and simple 2D photographs. The challenge for us will be to develop rich, high-quality educational content that is readily accessible and level appropriate for all plastic surgeons in training or in practice. We applaud the authors, ASAPS, and the Aesthetic Surgery Journal for relentless efforts to develop and advance the highest levels of aesthetic surgery education. Disclosures The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and publication of this article. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and publication of this article. REFERENCES 1. David JA, Rifkin WJ, Saadeh PB, Sinno S. Assessing the value of a multimedia-based aesthetic curriculum in plastic surgery residency: a single-center pilot study. Aesthet Surg J . 2018. doi: 10.1093/asj/sjy110. [Epub ahead of print] 2. Khansa I, Janis JE. Maximizing technological resources in plastic surgery resident education. J Craniofac Surg . 2015; 26( 8): 2264- 2269. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  3. Linder SA, Mele JA3rd, Capozzi A. Teaching aesthetic surgery at the resident level. Aesthetic Plast Surg . 1996; 20( 4): 351- 354. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  4. Qureshi AA, Parikh RP, Myckatyn TM, Tenenbaum MM. Resident cosmetic clinic: practice patterns, safety, and outcomes at an academic plastic surgery institution. Aesthet Surg J . 2016; 36( 9): NP273- NP280. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  5. Weissler JM, Carney MJ, Yan C, Percec I. The value of a resident aesthetic clinic: a 7-year institutional review and survey of the chief resident experience. Aesthet Surg J . 2017; 37( 10): 1188- 1198. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  6. Qureshi AA, Parikh RP, Sharma K, Myckatyn TM, Tenenbaum MM. Nonsurgical facial rejuvenation: outcomes and safety of neuromodulator and soft-tissue filler procedures performed in a resident cosmetic clinic. Aesthetic Plast Surg . 2017; 41( 5): 1177- 1183. Google Scholar CrossRef Search ADS PubMed  © 2018 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Aesthetic Surgery JournalOxford University Press

Published: May 26, 2018

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