Cognitive Deficits in the Acute Stage after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Cognitive Deficits in the Acute Stage after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage AbstractOBJECTIVEIn spite of fundamentally improved medical management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), many patients remain mentally impaired. However, the causes of these disturbances are unclear. The present study was performed to elucidate the significance of the hemorrhage itself and related events in the neuropsychological performance of patients in the acute stage after SAH.METHODSA series of 51 patients were examined, by means of a battery of cognitive tests, 1 to 13 days (mean, 5.9 d) after SAH. Thirty-three patients had experienced ruptured aneurysms, and 18 had sustained SAH of unknown origin. Furthermore, 25 patients who had undergone surgical treatment (a mean of 5.0 d earlier) of prolapsed lumbar discs served as a control groupRESULTSThe cognitive deficits of the patients after aneurysmal SAH proved to be comparable to those after spontaneous SAH of unknown origin, with the single exception of a significantly worse (P = 0.003) concentration capacity in the surgically treated group. The severity of SAH in computed tomographic scans correlated (up to r = 0.57, P < 0.001) with poor performance on tests of memory, concentration, divided attention, and perseveration. Frontal intracerebral hemorrhage led to significantly more errors in an aphasia screening test (P < 0.001) and a test of perseveration (P < 0.001). If acute hydrocephalus was present, the patients exhibited worse long-term memory (P < 0.001), showed slower reaction times (P = 0.01), and made more errors in the perseveration test (P = 0.004). Patients with intraventricular blood performed at significantly lower levels in the concentration (P = 0.001), divided attention (P = 0.01), long-term memory (P < 0.001), and perseveration (P = 0.003) tests.CONCLUSIONThe results emphasize that the severity of SAH (Fisher score) is the most important factor related to cognitive dysfunction, but frontal hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage, and acute hydrocephalus were also associated with cognitive deficits, compared with patients with SAH without these findings. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Cognitive Deficits in the Acute Stage after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Cognitive Deficits in the Acute Stage after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

CLINICAL STUDIES Cognitive Deficits in the Acute Stage after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Bernd O. Hiitter, Ph.D., llonka Kreitschmann-Andermahr, M.D., Joachim M. Gilsbach, M.D. D epartm ent o f Neurosurgery, U nive rsity o f Technology, R heinisch-W estfalische Technische H o c h s c h u le (RWTH) Aachen, Aachen, G e rm a n y O B JE C T IV E : In spite of fundamentally improved medical management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), many patients remain mentally impaired. However, the causes of these disturbances are unclear. The present study w as performed to elucidate the significance of the hemorrhage itself and related events in the neuropsychological performance of patients in the acute stage after SA H . M E T H O D S : A series of 51 patients were examined, by means of a battery of cognitive tests, 1 to 13 days (mean, 5.9 dl after SA H . Thirty-three patients had experienced ruptured aneurysms, and 18 had sustained SA H of unknown origin. Furthermore, 25 patients who had undergone surgical treatment (a mean of 5.0 d earlier) of prolapsed lumbar discs served as a control group. RESULTS: The cognitive deficits of the patients after aneurysmal SA H proved to be comparable to those after spontaneous SA H of unknown origin, with the single exception of a significantly worse (P = 0.003) concentration capacity in the surgically treated group. The severity of SA H in computed tomographic scans correlated (up to r = 0.57, P < 0.001) with poor performance on tests of memory, concentration, divided attention, and perseveration. Frontal intracerebral hemorrhage led to significantly more errors in an aphasia screening test (P < 0.001) and a test of perseveration (P < 0.001). If acute hydrocephalus was present, the patients exhibited worse long-term memory (P < 0.001), showed slower reaction times (P = 0.01), and made more errors in the perseveration test (P = 0.004). Patients with intraventricular blood performed at significantly lower levels in the concentration...
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Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199811000-00030
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVEIn spite of fundamentally improved medical management of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), many patients remain mentally impaired. However, the causes of these disturbances are unclear. The present study was performed to elucidate the significance of the hemorrhage itself and related events in the neuropsychological performance of patients in the acute stage after SAH.METHODSA series of 51 patients were examined, by means of a battery of cognitive tests, 1 to 13 days (mean, 5.9 d) after SAH. Thirty-three patients had experienced ruptured aneurysms, and 18 had sustained SAH of unknown origin. Furthermore, 25 patients who had undergone surgical treatment (a mean of 5.0 d earlier) of prolapsed lumbar discs served as a control groupRESULTSThe cognitive deficits of the patients after aneurysmal SAH proved to be comparable to those after spontaneous SAH of unknown origin, with the single exception of a significantly worse (P = 0.003) concentration capacity in the surgically treated group. The severity of SAH in computed tomographic scans correlated (up to r = 0.57, P < 0.001) with poor performance on tests of memory, concentration, divided attention, and perseveration. Frontal intracerebral hemorrhage led to significantly more errors in an aphasia screening test (P < 0.001) and a test of perseveration (P < 0.001). If acute hydrocephalus was present, the patients exhibited worse long-term memory (P < 0.001), showed slower reaction times (P = 0.01), and made more errors in the perseveration test (P = 0.004). Patients with intraventricular blood performed at significantly lower levels in the concentration (P = 0.001), divided attention (P = 0.01), long-term memory (P < 0.001), and perseveration (P = 0.003) tests.CONCLUSIONThe results emphasize that the severity of SAH (Fisher score) is the most important factor related to cognitive dysfunction, but frontal hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage, and acute hydrocephalus were also associated with cognitive deficits, compared with patients with SAH without these findings.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Nov 1, 1998

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