Can Sugar Metabolism in the Cambial Region Explain the Water Deficit Tolerance in Poplar?

Can Sugar Metabolism in the Cambial Region Explain the Water Deficit Tolerance in Poplar? Abstract Drought dramatically affects wood production by adversely impacting cambial cells and their derivatives. Photosynthesis and assimilate transport are also affected by drought conditions. Two poplar genotypes, Populus deltoides ‘Dvina’ and Populus alba ‘Marte’, demonstrated contrasting growth performance and water–carbon balance strategies; a mechanistic understanding of the water-deficit response was provided by these poplar species. The ‘Marte’ was found to be more anisohydric than the ‘Dvina’. This characteristic was associated with the capacity to reallocate carbohydrates during water deficits. In contrast, the ‘Dvina’ displayed more-conservative water management; carbohydrates were preferably stored or used for cellulose production rather than to achieve an osmotic balance between the phloem and the xylem. Data confirmed that the more ‘risk-taking’ characteristic of the ‘Marte’ allowed a rapid recovery following water deficit and was connected to a different carbohydrate metabolism. cambial region, carbohydrates, carbon turnover, Populus, recovery, starch, water deficit © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Experimental Botany Oxford University Press

Can Sugar Metabolism in the Cambial Region Explain the Water Deficit Tolerance in Poplar?

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.
ISSN
0022-0957
eISSN
1460-2431
D.O.I.
10.1093/jxb/ery195
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Drought dramatically affects wood production by adversely impacting cambial cells and their derivatives. Photosynthesis and assimilate transport are also affected by drought conditions. Two poplar genotypes, Populus deltoides ‘Dvina’ and Populus alba ‘Marte’, demonstrated contrasting growth performance and water–carbon balance strategies; a mechanistic understanding of the water-deficit response was provided by these poplar species. The ‘Marte’ was found to be more anisohydric than the ‘Dvina’. This characteristic was associated with the capacity to reallocate carbohydrates during water deficits. In contrast, the ‘Dvina’ displayed more-conservative water management; carbohydrates were preferably stored or used for cellulose production rather than to achieve an osmotic balance between the phloem and the xylem. Data confirmed that the more ‘risk-taking’ characteristic of the ‘Marte’ allowed a rapid recovery following water deficit and was connected to a different carbohydrate metabolism. cambial region, carbohydrates, carbon turnover, Populus, recovery, starch, water deficit © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Journal

Journal of Experimental BotanyOxford University Press

Published: May 26, 2018

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