Brain Structure Covariance Associated with Gait Control in Aging

Brain Structure Covariance Associated with Gait Control in Aging Abstract Background Structural and functional brain imaging methods have identified age-related changes in brain structures involved in gait control. This cross-sectional study aims to investigate gray matter networks associated with gait control in aging using structural covariance analysis. Methods Walking speed were measured in 326 non-demented older community-dwellers (age 71.3±4.5; 41.7% female) under three different walking conditions: normal walking and two challenging tasks: motor (i.e.; fast speed) and an attention-demanding dual task (i.e.; backward counting). Results Three main individual gray matter regions were positively correlated with walking speed (i.e.; slower walking speed was associated with lower brain volumes): right thalamus, right caudate nucleus and left middle frontal gyrus for normal walking, rapid walking and dual-task walking condition, respectively. The structural covariance analysis revealed that prefrontal regions were part of the networks associated with every walking condition; the right caudate was associated specifically with the hippocampus, amygdala and insula for the rapid walking condition and the left middle frontal gyrus with a network involving the cuneus for the dual-task condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that brain networks associated with gait control vary according to walking speed and depend on each walking condition. Gait control in aging involved a distributed network including regions for emotional control that are recruited in challenging walking conditions. Gait, neuroimaging, anatomical structural covariance, motor control, aging © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences Oxford University Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/brain-structure-covariance-associated-with-gait-control-in-aging-h6IyYYJtxa
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
ISSN
1079-5006
eISSN
1758-535X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gerona/gly123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Background Structural and functional brain imaging methods have identified age-related changes in brain structures involved in gait control. This cross-sectional study aims to investigate gray matter networks associated with gait control in aging using structural covariance analysis. Methods Walking speed were measured in 326 non-demented older community-dwellers (age 71.3±4.5; 41.7% female) under three different walking conditions: normal walking and two challenging tasks: motor (i.e.; fast speed) and an attention-demanding dual task (i.e.; backward counting). Results Three main individual gray matter regions were positively correlated with walking speed (i.e.; slower walking speed was associated with lower brain volumes): right thalamus, right caudate nucleus and left middle frontal gyrus for normal walking, rapid walking and dual-task walking condition, respectively. The structural covariance analysis revealed that prefrontal regions were part of the networks associated with every walking condition; the right caudate was associated specifically with the hippocampus, amygdala and insula for the rapid walking condition and the left middle frontal gyrus with a network involving the cuneus for the dual-task condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that brain networks associated with gait control vary according to walking speed and depend on each walking condition. Gait control in aging involved a distributed network including regions for emotional control that are recruited in challenging walking conditions. Gait, neuroimaging, anatomical structural covariance, motor control, aging © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical SciencesOxford University Press

Published: May 26, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off