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Association of 24-Hour Blood Pressure With Urinary Sodium Excretion in Healthy Adults

Association of 24-Hour Blood Pressure With Urinary Sodium Excretion in Healthy Adults BACKGROUNDWhile the positive relationship between urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure (BP) is well established for middle-aged to elderly individuals using office BP, data are limited for younger individuals and ambulatory BP measurements.METHODSOur analysis included 2,899 individuals aged 18 to 90 years from 2 population-based studies (GAPP, Swiss Kidney Project on Genes in Hypertension [SKIPOGH]). Participants with prevalent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or on BP-lowering treatment were excluded. In SKIPOGH, 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was used as a measure of sodium intake, while in GAPP it was calculated from fasting morning urinary samples using the Kawasaki formula. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the relationships of 24-hour urinary salt excretion with office and ambulatory BP measurements.RESULTSMean age, ambulatory BP, sodium excretion, and estimated glomerular filtration rate in GAPP and SKIPOGH were 35 and 44 years, 123/78 and 118/77 mm Hg, 4.2 and 3.3 g/d, and 110 and 99 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. A weak linear association was observed between 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP and urinary sodium excretion (β (95% confidence interval [CI]) per 1 g increase in sodium excretion (0.33 % (0.09; 0.57); P = 0.008). No significant relationships were observed for 24-hour ambulatory diastolic BP (β (95% CI) (0.13 % (−0.15; 0.40) P = 0.37). When repeating the analyses in different age groups, all BP indices appeared to have stronger relationships in the older age groups (>40 years).CONCLUSIONSIn these large cohorts of healthy adults, urinary sodium excretion was only weakly associated with systolic 24-hour ambulatory BP. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Hypertension Oxford University Press

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References (45)

Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected]
ISSN
0895-7061
eISSN
1941-7225
DOI
10.1093/ajh/hpy031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BACKGROUNDWhile the positive relationship between urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure (BP) is well established for middle-aged to elderly individuals using office BP, data are limited for younger individuals and ambulatory BP measurements.METHODSOur analysis included 2,899 individuals aged 18 to 90 years from 2 population-based studies (GAPP, Swiss Kidney Project on Genes in Hypertension [SKIPOGH]). Participants with prevalent cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or on BP-lowering treatment were excluded. In SKIPOGH, 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was used as a measure of sodium intake, while in GAPP it was calculated from fasting morning urinary samples using the Kawasaki formula. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the relationships of 24-hour urinary salt excretion with office and ambulatory BP measurements.RESULTSMean age, ambulatory BP, sodium excretion, and estimated glomerular filtration rate in GAPP and SKIPOGH were 35 and 44 years, 123/78 and 118/77 mm Hg, 4.2 and 3.3 g/d, and 110 and 99 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively. A weak linear association was observed between 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP and urinary sodium excretion (β (95% confidence interval [CI]) per 1 g increase in sodium excretion (0.33 % (0.09; 0.57); P = 0.008). No significant relationships were observed for 24-hour ambulatory diastolic BP (β (95% CI) (0.13 % (−0.15; 0.40) P = 0.37). When repeating the analyses in different age groups, all BP indices appeared to have stronger relationships in the older age groups (>40 years).CONCLUSIONSIn these large cohorts of healthy adults, urinary sodium excretion was only weakly associated with systolic 24-hour ambulatory BP.

Journal

American Journal of HypertensionOxford University Press

Published: Jun 11, 2018

Keywords: blood pressure; epidemiology; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure; hypertension; Kawasaki; office blood pressure; urinary salt excretion

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