Assessing the intersection/remagnetization puzzle with synthetic apparent polar wander paths

Assessing the intersection/remagnetization puzzle with synthetic apparent polar wander paths Summary Paleomagnetic data are of variable quality. To assist in a systematic assessment of data, a set of seven quality criteria (VQ1 – VQ7) were introduced by Van der Voo (1990). The last of those criteria ‘VQ7’ concerns the possibility of remagnetization when a particular paleomagnetic pole resembles a younger paleopole from the same stable region. While remagnetizations are often the culprit, the mere resemblance of an older pole to a younger pole does not a priori require that the rocks under investigation are remagnetized. Given that the Earth has a finite surface area; that apparent polar wander paths are represented as wide swathes rather than points, and that continental motion has taken place over several billion years, we ask the question ‘How likely is it for an apparent polar wander path to loop back on itself?’ To answer this question, we constructed synthetic apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) in an effort to evaluate the likelihood of self-intersection. We find that given 500 Myr of apparent polar wander, ∼60 per cent of the synthetic APWPs show self-intersection. Given 1000 Myr of apparent polar wander, ∼95 per cent of the synthetic APWPs show self-intersection. These results show that resemblance to younger paleopoles, over the long term, may be governed by simple probability rather than only remagnetization. We recognize that remagnetization does occur, sometimes pervasively, and must be reckoned with in the assessment of paleomagnetic data. Perhaps VQ7 should be amended to the first sentence in the original discussion (Van der Voo, 1990), and focus on satisfying ‘No suspicion of remagnetization’ via other means rather than solely a resemblance to younger poles. Paleomagnetism, Numerical modelling, Apparent polar wander paths, Intersections, Remagnetization © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Journal International Oxford University Press

Assessing the intersection/remagnetization puzzle with synthetic apparent polar wander paths

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/assessing-the-intersection-remagnetization-puzzle-with-synthetic-EI0wZNPj04
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.
ISSN
0956-540X
eISSN
1365-246X
D.O.I.
10.1093/gji/ggy216
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Paleomagnetic data are of variable quality. To assist in a systematic assessment of data, a set of seven quality criteria (VQ1 – VQ7) were introduced by Van der Voo (1990). The last of those criteria ‘VQ7’ concerns the possibility of remagnetization when a particular paleomagnetic pole resembles a younger paleopole from the same stable region. While remagnetizations are often the culprit, the mere resemblance of an older pole to a younger pole does not a priori require that the rocks under investigation are remagnetized. Given that the Earth has a finite surface area; that apparent polar wander paths are represented as wide swathes rather than points, and that continental motion has taken place over several billion years, we ask the question ‘How likely is it for an apparent polar wander path to loop back on itself?’ To answer this question, we constructed synthetic apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) in an effort to evaluate the likelihood of self-intersection. We find that given 500 Myr of apparent polar wander, ∼60 per cent of the synthetic APWPs show self-intersection. Given 1000 Myr of apparent polar wander, ∼95 per cent of the synthetic APWPs show self-intersection. These results show that resemblance to younger paleopoles, over the long term, may be governed by simple probability rather than only remagnetization. We recognize that remagnetization does occur, sometimes pervasively, and must be reckoned with in the assessment of paleomagnetic data. Perhaps VQ7 should be amended to the first sentence in the original discussion (Van der Voo, 1990), and focus on satisfying ‘No suspicion of remagnetization’ via other means rather than solely a resemblance to younger poles. Paleomagnetism, Numerical modelling, Apparent polar wander paths, Intersections, Remagnetization © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society. This article is published and distributed under the terms of the Oxford University Press, Standard Journals Publication Model (https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/about_us/legal/notices)

Journal

Geophysical Journal InternationalOxford University Press

Published: May 28, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off