Arthur Golding’s ‘A Moral Fabletalk’ and Other Renaissance Fable Translations. Ed. by Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos

Arthur Golding’s ‘A Moral Fabletalk’ and Other Renaissance Fable Translations. Ed. by Liza... Forum for Modern Language Studies Vol. 54,No. 1 REVIEWS Arthur Golding’s ‘A Moral Fabletalk’ and Other Renaissance Fable Translations. Ed. by Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos. Cambridge: MHRA (Tudor & Stuart Translations, 12), 2017. 596 pp. £35.00 / $45.00 / e42.00.ISBN 978–1–78188–606–9. Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos’s critical edition of Arthur Golding’s fable translations is the latest worthy addition to the Modern Humanities Research Association’s Tudor & Stuart Translations programme. The broader se- ries aims to address a perceived gap in critical editions of early modern English translations available to students and researchers, reflecting scholarly consensus regarding the significance of these works to literature of the period. This particular volume offers a full edition of Golding’s A Moral Fabletalk, supplemented by selections from other Aesopian translations by William Caxton, Richard Smith, John Brinsley and John Ogilby. The individual fables are sup- plemented by an index, a glossary of lesser-known terms, a comprehensive bibliography, and summaries of the publication history of each text, all of which help make the volume invaluable as a reference work. This text will be of interest to anyone concerned with classical reception in the Renaissance, early modern animal studies, the medieval bestiary tradition, or more generally the ‘political, biblical, national, and pedagogical purposes’ of fables (p. 1). In their scholarly introduction, the editors provide readers with a useful overview of early modern theories of fable (pp. 2–12) and a discussion of the challenges and opportunities unique to fable translation as opposed to literary translation (pp. 13–28), both grounded in thoughtful compari- sons between the authors featured in the volume. Acknowledging that accompanying artwork was crucial to Renaissance readers’ experiences of fable translations, Blake and Santos offer a copiously illustrated volume. The editors are particularly attentive to the pedagogical role of fa- ble translation (pp. 18–22), a practice which merits more consideration than it has received in existing influential accounts of the Elizabethan grammar classroom. Other highlights include an analysis of potential tensions between narrative and moral exemplarity in fable (pp. 28–36), as well as the editors’ provision of particularly bizarre selections like Caxton’s ‘Of the Wolf which Made a Fart’ and Ogilby’s verses about the man who married his cat (pp. 330 and 473 respectively, for those who are interested). [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqx041] BUBB,ALEXANDER. Meeting Without Knowing It: Kipling and Yeats at the Fin de Sie `cle.Oxford: Oxford University Press (Oxford English Monographs), 2016. 288 pp. £65.00.ISBN 978–0–19–875387–2. Kipling and Yeats have long been seen as the two towering figures of turn-of-the-century English literature, especially by foreign readers. There are obvious links between them to sup- port that perception. They were exact contemporaries, giving voice to conservative political views in Romantic expressions during turbulently changing times. However, they have come to be seen as distinct enough for posterity to assign them to different periods (Kipling to the Victorian, Yeats to the Modernist), and their oeuvres are often read in the clashing contexts of British imperialism and Irish nationalism. Bubb’s comparative study takes the convergences in their lives and poetics as its subject matter with the aim of bringing them back into ‘critical contemporaneity’ and discovering the legacies of the fin de sie `cle which, he suggests, lasted throughout the twentieth century. Rather than treating the turn of the centu- ries as a unitary epoch, Bubb makes use of Michel Foucault’s notion of the ‘constellation’ of discourses. Meeting Without Knowing It – which borrows its title from Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge – examines the intersecting and separating discourses of decadence, nationality and the Romantic in Kipling’s and Yeats’s literary education, mature works and legacies. Tracing the chronology of their ideological intersections in their formative years before the Boer War to their early-twentieth century ‘critical estrangement’, Bubb convincingly argues that their poetics crossed several paths. Inspired by Canetti’s notion of negative influence, he narrates the ‘unintentional collaboration’ and ‘unacknowledged rivalry’ of the two literary gi- ants who never met or corresponded, though often lived and worked near each other. The last subheading in the introduction identifies the book as a ‘comparative biography’. However, Bubb is more interested in ‘key moments’ as Kipling and Yeats progressed through time (from late-Victorian to modern times) and space (from peripheries to the centre), and # The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/fmls/article-abstract/54/1/115/4798972 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forum for Modern Language Studies Oxford University Press

Arthur Golding’s ‘A Moral Fabletalk’ and Other Renaissance Fable Translations. Ed. by Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos

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© The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532.
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Forum for Modern Language Studies Vol. 54,No. 1 REVIEWS Arthur Golding’s ‘A Moral Fabletalk’ and Other Renaissance Fable Translations. Ed. by Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos. Cambridge: MHRA (Tudor & Stuart Translations, 12), 2017. 596 pp. £35.00 / $45.00 / e42.00.ISBN 978–1–78188–606–9. Liza Blake and Kathryn Vomero Santos’s critical edition of Arthur Golding’s fable translations is the latest worthy addition to the Modern Humanities Research Association’s Tudor & Stuart Translations programme. The broader se- ries aims to address a perceived gap in critical editions of early modern English translations available to students and researchers, reflecting scholarly consensus regarding the significance of these works to literature of the period. This particular volume offers a full edition of Golding’s A Moral Fabletalk, supplemented by selections from other Aesopian translations by William Caxton, Richard Smith, John Brinsley and John Ogilby. The individual fables are sup- plemented by an index, a glossary of lesser-known terms, a comprehensive bibliography, and summaries of the publication history of each text, all of which help make the volume invaluable as a reference work. This text will be of interest to anyone concerned with classical reception in the Renaissance, early modern animal studies, the medieval bestiary tradition, or more generally the ‘political, biblical, national, and pedagogical purposes’ of fables (p. 1). In their scholarly introduction, the editors provide readers with a useful overview of early modern theories of fable (pp. 2–12) and a discussion of the challenges and opportunities unique to fable translation as opposed to literary translation (pp. 13–28), both grounded in thoughtful compari- sons between the authors featured in the volume. Acknowledging that accompanying artwork was crucial to Renaissance readers’ experiences of fable translations, Blake and Santos offer a copiously illustrated volume. The editors are particularly attentive to the pedagogical role of fa- ble translation (pp. 18–22), a practice which merits more consideration than it has received in existing influential accounts of the Elizabethan grammar classroom. Other highlights include an analysis of potential tensions between narrative and moral exemplarity in fable (pp. 28–36), as well as the editors’ provision of particularly bizarre selections like Caxton’s ‘Of the Wolf which Made a Fart’ and Ogilby’s verses about the man who married his cat (pp. 330 and 473 respectively, for those who are interested). [doi: 10.1093/fmls/cqx041] BUBB,ALEXANDER. Meeting Without Knowing It: Kipling and Yeats at the Fin de Sie `cle.Oxford: Oxford University Press (Oxford English Monographs), 2016. 288 pp. £65.00.ISBN 978–0–19–875387–2. Kipling and Yeats have long been seen as the two towering figures of turn-of-the-century English literature, especially by foreign readers. There are obvious links between them to sup- port that perception. They were exact contemporaries, giving voice to conservative political views in Romantic expressions during turbulently changing times. However, they have come to be seen as distinct enough for posterity to assign them to different periods (Kipling to the Victorian, Yeats to the Modernist), and their oeuvres are often read in the clashing contexts of British imperialism and Irish nationalism. Bubb’s comparative study takes the convergences in their lives and poetics as its subject matter with the aim of bringing them back into ‘critical contemporaneity’ and discovering the legacies of the fin de sie `cle which, he suggests, lasted throughout the twentieth century. Rather than treating the turn of the centu- ries as a unitary epoch, Bubb makes use of Michel Foucault’s notion of the ‘constellation’ of discourses. Meeting Without Knowing It – which borrows its title from Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge – examines the intersecting and separating discourses of decadence, nationality and the Romantic in Kipling’s and Yeats’s literary education, mature works and legacies. Tracing the chronology of their ideological intersections in their formative years before the Boer War to their early-twentieth century ‘critical estrangement’, Bubb convincingly argues that their poetics crossed several paths. Inspired by Canetti’s notion of negative influence, he narrates the ‘unintentional collaboration’ and ‘unacknowledged rivalry’ of the two literary gi- ants who never met or corresponded, though often lived and worked near each other. The last subheading in the introduction identifies the book as a ‘comparative biography’. However, Bubb is more interested in ‘key moments’ as Kipling and Yeats progressed through time (from late-Victorian to modern times) and space (from peripheries to the centre), and # The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press for the Court of the University of St Andrews. All rights reserved. The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland: No. SC013532. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/fmls/article-abstract/54/1/115/4798972 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

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Published: Jan 1, 2018

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