Annals of Work Exposures and Health Performance, 2017

Annals of Work Exposures and Health Performance, 2017 I am pleased to offer this report of the publication record of the first volume of Annals of Work Exposures and Health (AWEH) completed in 2017. The change from the Annals of Occupational Hygiene to AWEH was made in recognition of the vast changes occurring in the ways in which work is organized by most enterprises, the risks to health that accompany these changes, and the need for the occupational hygiene community to change with it. In light of these changes in the field, we sought to broaden the types of exposures addressed by the journal, and the methods required to understand the nature of the new threats to health. While changing the direction of the journal will take some years to become fully realized, we have made good progress in this first year of publication. Submissions have remained robust, with 263 submissions received, a slight increase on 2016. These include 220 original research articles, 9 reviews, 7 commentaries, and 18 short communications. Among the 237 papers for which final publication decisions were made, 102 were accepted, giving us a rejection rate of 57%. In 2017, we published 85 research papers; 7 short communications; 3 review articles; and an additional 5 commentaries, 7 editorials, and 3 letters to the editor. An analysis of the content of the published research papers and short communications shows that exposure assessment is still a strength of the Annals (38%, down from 43% in 2016). Consistent with our intent to focus on papers with direct consequence for worker health, there was a reduction in the number of papers addressing technical aspects of exposure measurement (10%, down from 20% in 2016). However, we carried fewer papers on management and training (1%, down from 14% in 2016). A larger fraction of our papers did address basic scientific aspects of exposure (23%, up from 6% in 2016). Consistent with our goals, papers classified as epidemiology or risk assessment were substantially more frequent than in past years. Papers on control methods and PPE evaluations were steady at 6 and 4%, respectively. In terms of agents addressed, the proportion of aerosols papers was considerably less than in 2016 (27%, down from 40%), with 25% tackling chemicals, 20% multiple agents, 13% physical agents, and 9% bioaerosols. More authors came from North America and Europe (excluding the UK and Scandinavia) than any other regions (38 and 33%, respectively). In producing these data on published material, we recognize that many of the papers were submitted to the journal in 2016, prior to the shift in focus and name. The editorial team coordinated the collection of 516 peer reviews from 305 individuals—a notable increase on the previous year and an achievement for everyone involved. Our time for papers in review has been monitored using a 6-month running average, giving the average (median) time to a first decision of 39 (38) days, while time to reach a final decision (after revision and re-review) was 97 (60) days (based on July to December). The Annals journal impact factor (JIF) for 2016 was 1.71, a decrease on the 2015 level of 1.743. Our recent changes for the journal are intended to turn this trend around in subsequent years. Our JIF ranking among other journals classified as ‘Public, Environmental and Occupational Health’ is currently 97 among 176 journals, and 71 out of 92 journals classified as ‘Toxicology’. In 2017, three assistant editors moved on to new endeavours. We thank Lee Kenny, Thomas Küpper, and Renee Anthony for their valued contribution to the Annals over past years. Two new assistant editors brought their editorial expertise to the Board. Professor Vivi Schlünssen, a physician-epidemiologist from the Department of Public Health at Aarhus University in Denmark, specialises in respiratory health effects in response to exposures to aerosols and allergens. Professor Gurumurthy Ramachandran, from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, USA, the author of a comprehensive textbook on occupational hygiene, brings expertise on aerosol measurement, epidemiologic exposure assessment, and statistical methods, including Bayesian statistics. In reflecting on this first year of AWEH, I see a gradual shift in emphasis of the papers submitted and published. While we continue to publish high-quality research on the means of assessing traditional work exposures, such as chemical, physical, and biological agents, there is a growing incorporation of psychosocial hazards, risk assessments, and exposures to working populations outside of standard industrial employment. We look forward to consolidating the changes made to the journal in 2017, publishing high-quality science dedicated to the assessment and control of risks to health and well-being at work. Declaration The author declares no conflict of interest for this editorial. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Work Exposures and Health (formerly Annals Of Occupational Hygiene) Oxford University Press

Annals of Work Exposures and Health Performance, 2017

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.
ISSN
2398-7308
eISSN
2398-7316
D.O.I.
10.1093/annweh/wxy005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I am pleased to offer this report of the publication record of the first volume of Annals of Work Exposures and Health (AWEH) completed in 2017. The change from the Annals of Occupational Hygiene to AWEH was made in recognition of the vast changes occurring in the ways in which work is organized by most enterprises, the risks to health that accompany these changes, and the need for the occupational hygiene community to change with it. In light of these changes in the field, we sought to broaden the types of exposures addressed by the journal, and the methods required to understand the nature of the new threats to health. While changing the direction of the journal will take some years to become fully realized, we have made good progress in this first year of publication. Submissions have remained robust, with 263 submissions received, a slight increase on 2016. These include 220 original research articles, 9 reviews, 7 commentaries, and 18 short communications. Among the 237 papers for which final publication decisions were made, 102 were accepted, giving us a rejection rate of 57%. In 2017, we published 85 research papers; 7 short communications; 3 review articles; and an additional 5 commentaries, 7 editorials, and 3 letters to the editor. An analysis of the content of the published research papers and short communications shows that exposure assessment is still a strength of the Annals (38%, down from 43% in 2016). Consistent with our intent to focus on papers with direct consequence for worker health, there was a reduction in the number of papers addressing technical aspects of exposure measurement (10%, down from 20% in 2016). However, we carried fewer papers on management and training (1%, down from 14% in 2016). A larger fraction of our papers did address basic scientific aspects of exposure (23%, up from 6% in 2016). Consistent with our goals, papers classified as epidemiology or risk assessment were substantially more frequent than in past years. Papers on control methods and PPE evaluations were steady at 6 and 4%, respectively. In terms of agents addressed, the proportion of aerosols papers was considerably less than in 2016 (27%, down from 40%), with 25% tackling chemicals, 20% multiple agents, 13% physical agents, and 9% bioaerosols. More authors came from North America and Europe (excluding the UK and Scandinavia) than any other regions (38 and 33%, respectively). In producing these data on published material, we recognize that many of the papers were submitted to the journal in 2016, prior to the shift in focus and name. The editorial team coordinated the collection of 516 peer reviews from 305 individuals—a notable increase on the previous year and an achievement for everyone involved. Our time for papers in review has been monitored using a 6-month running average, giving the average (median) time to a first decision of 39 (38) days, while time to reach a final decision (after revision and re-review) was 97 (60) days (based on July to December). The Annals journal impact factor (JIF) for 2016 was 1.71, a decrease on the 2015 level of 1.743. Our recent changes for the journal are intended to turn this trend around in subsequent years. Our JIF ranking among other journals classified as ‘Public, Environmental and Occupational Health’ is currently 97 among 176 journals, and 71 out of 92 journals classified as ‘Toxicology’. In 2017, three assistant editors moved on to new endeavours. We thank Lee Kenny, Thomas Küpper, and Renee Anthony for their valued contribution to the Annals over past years. Two new assistant editors brought their editorial expertise to the Board. Professor Vivi Schlünssen, a physician-epidemiologist from the Department of Public Health at Aarhus University in Denmark, specialises in respiratory health effects in response to exposures to aerosols and allergens. Professor Gurumurthy Ramachandran, from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, USA, the author of a comprehensive textbook on occupational hygiene, brings expertise on aerosol measurement, epidemiologic exposure assessment, and statistical methods, including Bayesian statistics. In reflecting on this first year of AWEH, I see a gradual shift in emphasis of the papers submitted and published. While we continue to publish high-quality research on the means of assessing traditional work exposures, such as chemical, physical, and biological agents, there is a growing incorporation of psychosocial hazards, risk assessments, and exposures to working populations outside of standard industrial employment. We look forward to consolidating the changes made to the journal in 2017, publishing high-quality science dedicated to the assessment and control of risks to health and well-being at work. Declaration The author declares no conflict of interest for this editorial. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

Journal

Annals of Work Exposures and Health (formerly Annals Of Occupational Hygiene)Oxford University Press

Published: Apr 1, 2018

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