Acetylenotrophy: A Hidden but Ubiquitous Microbial Metabolism?

Acetylenotrophy: A Hidden but Ubiquitous Microbial Metabolism? Abstract Acetylene (IUPAC name: ethyne) is a colorless, gaseous hydrocarbon, composed of two triple bonded carbon atoms attached to hydrogens (C2H2). When microbiologists and biogeochemists think of acetylene they immediately think of its use as an inhibitory compound of certain microbial processes and a tracer for nitrogen fixation. However, what is less widely known is that anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms can degrade acetylene, using it as a sole carbon and energy source and providing the basis of a microbial food web. Here, we review what is known about acetylene degrading organisms and introduce the term ‘acetylenotrophs’ to refer to the microorganisms that carry out this metabolic pathway. In addition, we review the known environmental sources of acetylene and postulate the presence of hidden acetylene cycle. The abundance of bacteria capable of using acetylene and other alkynes as a energy and carbon source suggests that there are energy cycles present in the environment that are driven by acetylene and alkyne production and consumption that are isolated from atmospheric exchange. Acetylenotrophs may have developed to leverage the relatively high concentrations of acetylene in the pre-Cambrian atmosphere, evolving later to survive in specialized niches where acetylene and other alkynes were produced. Acetylene degraders, acetylenotrophs, acetylene, ethyne Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png FEMS Microbiology Ecology Oxford University Press

Acetylenotrophy: A Hidden but Ubiquitous Microbial Metabolism?

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Publisher
Blackwell
Copyright
Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2018.
ISSN
0168-6496
eISSN
1574-6941
D.O.I.
10.1093/femsec/fiy103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Acetylene (IUPAC name: ethyne) is a colorless, gaseous hydrocarbon, composed of two triple bonded carbon atoms attached to hydrogens (C2H2). When microbiologists and biogeochemists think of acetylene they immediately think of its use as an inhibitory compound of certain microbial processes and a tracer for nitrogen fixation. However, what is less widely known is that anaerobic and aerobic microorganisms can degrade acetylene, using it as a sole carbon and energy source and providing the basis of a microbial food web. Here, we review what is known about acetylene degrading organisms and introduce the term ‘acetylenotrophs’ to refer to the microorganisms that carry out this metabolic pathway. In addition, we review the known environmental sources of acetylene and postulate the presence of hidden acetylene cycle. The abundance of bacteria capable of using acetylene and other alkynes as a energy and carbon source suggests that there are energy cycles present in the environment that are driven by acetylene and alkyne production and consumption that are isolated from atmospheric exchange. Acetylenotrophs may have developed to leverage the relatively high concentrations of acetylene in the pre-Cambrian atmosphere, evolving later to survive in specialized niches where acetylene and other alkynes were produced. Acetylene degraders, acetylenotrophs, acetylene, ethyne Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of FEMS 2018. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

Journal

FEMS Microbiology EcologyOxford University Press

Published: May 31, 2018

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