Accuracy of a Miniature Intracranial Pressure Monitor, Its Function during Magnetic Resonance Scanning, and Assessment of Image Artifact Generation

Accuracy of a Miniature Intracranial Pressure Monitor, Its Function during Magnetic Resonance... AbstractOBJECTIVE:We examined the accuracy and repeatability of an intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor (Codman MicroSensor; Johnson & Johnson Professional, Inc., Raynham, MA) in a nonmagnetic environment and during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting image artifact generation was calculated. ICP monitoring is essential in management of severe head injury, but few ICP monitoring devices are compatible with use in an MRI scanner. The use of MRI to assess head injury is increasing, and developing safe methods of continuously monitoring ICP may improve patient care.METHODS:A water manometer was used as the standard for comparison. We assessed pressure readings from the ICP monitor in a nonmagnetic environment using a standard and a long connector cable between the pressure transducer and display unit. This long cable permitted testing during MRI sequences because the display unit could be distanced from the magnet. Accuracy was determined during T2-weighted imaging, proton spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted imaging, and artifact generation was assesseRESULTS:We found a high degree of accuracy for repeated measurements over a clinical pressure range using both standard and long connector cables outside the MRI room. During MRI scanning, the ICP monitor was accurate during T2 and proton spectroscopy sequences. Accuracy during diffusion-weighted imaging, however, was clinically unacceptable. This ICP monitor creates a reduction in signal-to-noise ratio in the received signal during T2-weighted imaging and proton spectroscopic imaging, with the obtained images still radiologically interpretable.CONCLUSION:The Codman ICP monitor is sufficiently accurate and free of artifact generation to be used during most clinical MRI applications. This could enhance patient monitoring and safety. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurosurgery Oxford University Press

Accuracy of a Miniature Intracranial Pressure Monitor, Its Function during Magnetic Resonance Scanning, and Assessment of Image Artifact Generation

Accuracy of a Miniature Intracranial Pressure Monitor, Its Function during Magnetic Resonance Scanning, and Assessment of Image Artifact Generation

agnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Accuracy of a Miniature Intracranial is difficult in patients with severe brain injury or other neurological con­ Pressure Monitor, Its Function during ditions requiring intensive care because 1) it is difficult to monitor the patients Magnetic Resonance Scanning, and adequately while in the scanner, and 2) many types of essential monitoring Assessment of Image Artifact Generation equipment are not MRI compatible, ei­ ther because they are ferromagnetic or because the magnetic field, magnetic field gradients, and radiofrequency ra­ Carol S.A. Macmillan, M.R.C.P., F.R.C.A., diation interfere with their performance. James M. W ild, Ph.D., Peter J.D. Andrews, M.D., Although more MRI-compatible equip­ ment is being developed permitting se­ Ian Marshall, Ph.D., Paul A. Armitage, B.Sc., riously ill patients to be imaged safely, Joanna M. Wardlaw, M.D., Valerie J. Easton, B.Sc., little attention has been focused on in­ James Cannon, B.Sc.Hons. tracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. We studied the performance of the Cod­ Departments of Anaesthetics (PJDA), Clinical Neurosciences (CSAM, JM W a, V)E, JC), and man ICP monitor (a strain gauge trans­ Medical Physics (JM W i, IM, PAA), University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland ducer) (Fig. 1 A ) against a standard (a water column manometer) and assessed the artifact generation during T2- O BJEC TIVE: W e examined the accuracy and repeatability of an intracranial weighted imaging, single voxel proton pressure (ICP) monitor (Codman MicroSensor; Johnson & Johnson Pro­ spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted fessional, Inc., Raynham, MA) in a nonmagnetic environment and during imaging (DWI) sequences using a 1.5- magnetic resonance imaging (M RI). The resulting image artifact genera­ Tesla MRI scanner. This scanner was not equipped with an actively shielded gra­ tion was calculated. ICP monitoring is essential in management of severe dient set. head...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/ou_press/accuracy-of-a-miniature-intracranial-pressure-monitor-its-function-9ojZGPJzbm
Publisher
Congress of Neurological Surgeons
Copyright
© Published by Oxford University Press.
ISSN
0148-396X
eISSN
1524-4040
D.O.I.
10.1097/00006123-199907000-00047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractOBJECTIVE:We examined the accuracy and repeatability of an intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor (Codman MicroSensor; Johnson & Johnson Professional, Inc., Raynham, MA) in a nonmagnetic environment and during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting image artifact generation was calculated. ICP monitoring is essential in management of severe head injury, but few ICP monitoring devices are compatible with use in an MRI scanner. The use of MRI to assess head injury is increasing, and developing safe methods of continuously monitoring ICP may improve patient care.METHODS:A water manometer was used as the standard for comparison. We assessed pressure readings from the ICP monitor in a nonmagnetic environment using a standard and a long connector cable between the pressure transducer and display unit. This long cable permitted testing during MRI sequences because the display unit could be distanced from the magnet. Accuracy was determined during T2-weighted imaging, proton spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted imaging, and artifact generation was assesseRESULTS:We found a high degree of accuracy for repeated measurements over a clinical pressure range using both standard and long connector cables outside the MRI room. During MRI scanning, the ICP monitor was accurate during T2 and proton spectroscopy sequences. Accuracy during diffusion-weighted imaging, however, was clinically unacceptable. This ICP monitor creates a reduction in signal-to-noise ratio in the received signal during T2-weighted imaging and proton spectroscopic imaging, with the obtained images still radiologically interpretable.CONCLUSION:The Codman ICP monitor is sufficiently accurate and free of artifact generation to be used during most clinical MRI applications. This could enhance patient monitoring and safety.

Journal

NeurosurgeryOxford University Press

Published: Jul 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off