A tribute to Françoise Poirier (1954–2018)

A tribute to Françoise Poirier (1954–2018) Glycobiology, 2018, vol. 28, no. 6, 348 doi: 10.1093/glycob/cwy036 Advance Access Publication Date: 3 May 2018 Glyco-Forum Glyco-Forum at the Institute Cochin. Her groupnot only focusedondeciphering galectin expression during murine embryonic development but also gen- erated additional mutant mice strains to study galectin function in embryogenesis. To this day, these strains are highly valuable tools that are widely used by the international scientific community to study the functions of galectins in research fields outside developmental biology, including immunology, neurobiology, reproduction and oncology. The contribution of Françoise to the galectin field continued when she moved with her team to the Institute Jacques Monod in 2001. There, she participated in the phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate galectins which provided insight in the evolutionary history of this protein family. Thanks to the work of Françoise, the galectin research field was able to advance beyond the boundaries of glycobiology and to become a topic of interest in many research communities. All these contributions earned her well deserved international recognition. Apart for her scientific accomplishments, Françoise will also be remembered for her kindheartedness and generosity. She had an open personality, was easy to approach and served as mentor for many jun- ior scientists. She enjoyed exchanging ideas and discussing the direction of the research field. She often drew pictures during conversations on whatever paper was at hand, including paper napkins. On one occa- sion a walk alongside the river Seine was the right time to discuss new exciting projects, such as on how galectin-1 might facilitate blood ves- sel growth. Her enthusiasm and passion for science was infectious, and It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of Françoise she was truly exhilarated when tumor growth experiments showed Poirier on 2 March 2018, at the age of 63. With her death, the field of strong phenotypes in galectin-mutant mice or when immune regulatory glycobiology, and the galectin community in particular, has lost an mechanisms became evident from the analysis of these mouse strains esteemed and passionate scientist, a kind and respected colleague, a (and there was always good food and champagne). truly caring person and a dear and loved friend to many. Francoise became a hub of a growing Parisien and extended The scientific career of Françoise started at the Curie Institute Orsay French and European galectin community, to which she invited others, near Paris where she studied the mitogenic properties of the Rous sar- and so generously served as a real bridge that connected scientists in coma virus and performed structure-function analyses on the src gene in the field and led to many long-lasting collaborations and friendships the laboratory of Georges Calothy. After obtaining her PhD in 1984, both within and outside the galectin community. Françoise moved to England to study gene expression regulation during embryonic stem cell differentiation in the group of Peter Rigby at the She will be truly missed by all of us. National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London. This Jérôme Collignon research led to the discovery of L-14 (later renamed galectin-1) as a lec- Tien Dang tin involved in different stages of embryogenesis, including implantation, Delphine Delacour muscle development and neuronal differentiation. She continued her Ralph Jacob work on galectin-1 at Columbia University in New York, where she Hakon Leffler joined the group of Elizabeth Robertson in 1989. There she created the Johannes Ludger first galectin-1 null mice which surprisingly did not exhibit any obvious Gabriel A. Rabinovich phenotype. However, Françoise was too much of an optimist and enthu- Jean Pierre Rousset siast to become disheartened by this. She returned to Paris, France in Victor L. Thijssen 1992 to further explore the role of galectins in embryonic development Mireille Viguier © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com 348 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/glycob/article-abstract/28/6/348/4993048 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 20 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Glycobiology Oxford University Press

A tribute to Françoise Poirier (1954–2018)

Glycobiology , Volume Advance Article (6) – May 3, 2018
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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
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0959-6658
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1460-2423
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10.1093/glycob/cwy036
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Abstract

Glycobiology, 2018, vol. 28, no. 6, 348 doi: 10.1093/glycob/cwy036 Advance Access Publication Date: 3 May 2018 Glyco-Forum Glyco-Forum at the Institute Cochin. Her groupnot only focusedondeciphering galectin expression during murine embryonic development but also gen- erated additional mutant mice strains to study galectin function in embryogenesis. To this day, these strains are highly valuable tools that are widely used by the international scientific community to study the functions of galectins in research fields outside developmental biology, including immunology, neurobiology, reproduction and oncology. The contribution of Françoise to the galectin field continued when she moved with her team to the Institute Jacques Monod in 2001. There, she participated in the phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate galectins which provided insight in the evolutionary history of this protein family. Thanks to the work of Françoise, the galectin research field was able to advance beyond the boundaries of glycobiology and to become a topic of interest in many research communities. All these contributions earned her well deserved international recognition. Apart for her scientific accomplishments, Françoise will also be remembered for her kindheartedness and generosity. She had an open personality, was easy to approach and served as mentor for many jun- ior scientists. She enjoyed exchanging ideas and discussing the direction of the research field. She often drew pictures during conversations on whatever paper was at hand, including paper napkins. On one occa- sion a walk alongside the river Seine was the right time to discuss new exciting projects, such as on how galectin-1 might facilitate blood ves- sel growth. Her enthusiasm and passion for science was infectious, and It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of Françoise she was truly exhilarated when tumor growth experiments showed Poirier on 2 March 2018, at the age of 63. With her death, the field of strong phenotypes in galectin-mutant mice or when immune regulatory glycobiology, and the galectin community in particular, has lost an mechanisms became evident from the analysis of these mouse strains esteemed and passionate scientist, a kind and respected colleague, a (and there was always good food and champagne). truly caring person and a dear and loved friend to many. Francoise became a hub of a growing Parisien and extended The scientific career of Françoise started at the Curie Institute Orsay French and European galectin community, to which she invited others, near Paris where she studied the mitogenic properties of the Rous sar- and so generously served as a real bridge that connected scientists in coma virus and performed structure-function analyses on the src gene in the field and led to many long-lasting collaborations and friendships the laboratory of Georges Calothy. After obtaining her PhD in 1984, both within and outside the galectin community. Françoise moved to England to study gene expression regulation during embryonic stem cell differentiation in the group of Peter Rigby at the She will be truly missed by all of us. National Institute for Medical Research, Mill Hill, London. This Jérôme Collignon research led to the discovery of L-14 (later renamed galectin-1) as a lec- Tien Dang tin involved in different stages of embryogenesis, including implantation, Delphine Delacour muscle development and neuronal differentiation. She continued her Ralph Jacob work on galectin-1 at Columbia University in New York, where she Hakon Leffler joined the group of Elizabeth Robertson in 1989. There she created the Johannes Ludger first galectin-1 null mice which surprisingly did not exhibit any obvious Gabriel A. Rabinovich phenotype. However, Françoise was too much of an optimist and enthu- Jean Pierre Rousset siast to become disheartened by this. She returned to Paris, France in Victor L. Thijssen 1992 to further explore the role of galectins in embryonic development Mireille Viguier © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com 348 Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/glycob/article-abstract/28/6/348/4993048 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 20 June 2018

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GlycobiologyOxford University Press

Published: May 3, 2018

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