A Supposed Quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem

A Supposed Quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem March 2018 NOTES AND QUERIES 49 in Almond fit nicely into this line of contem- However, Nashe could have found the phrase porary thought. ‘anima fit tota caro’ in Johann Altensteig’s ARUN CHETA Lexicon theologicum (a textbook that Nashe Sheffield Hallam University might possibly have used), which claims under doi:10.1093/notesj/gjx189 the heading ‘pollutio’, that ‘secundum August. The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University in hoc opere anima fit tota caro’. Another text, Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, which like Nashe and Altensteig mentions ‘pol- please email: journals.permissions@oup.com lutio’ in this connection and is even closer in time, Advance Access publication 24 January, 2018 is an edition of Bernadino of Siena’s works that suggests, ‘secundum Aug. in huiusmodi opere A SUPPOSED QUOTATION FROM anima fit tota caro, quia corruptio præualet ipsi AUGUSTINE IN THOMAS NASHE’S naturæ. De pollutione nocturna, secundum CHRISTS TEARES OVER JERUSALEM 4 Landulphum, hoc seruandum est’. The phrase UNLIKE in other works by Thomas Nashe, St ‘anima fit tota caro’ is moreover found, reference Augustine is a fairly common presence in his to Augustine and all, in the 1576 edition of the longest work, the religious pamphlet Christs German scholastic philosopher Gabriel Biel’s Teares over Jerusalem (1593). Nashe’s use of Sacri canonis missae expositio. While it would the church father in this text may be unsurpris- be beyond the scope of this note to establish ing considering the religious fervour that perme- who borrowed from whom in these editions or ates Christs Teares. In fact, in at least one case, whether they had one single source in common, Nashe cites Augustine’s Confessions exactly it can be observed that none of them actually sug- enough for his early twentieth-century editor gests that the phrase ‘anima fit tota caro’ is a R. B. McKerrow to curtly note that ‘the refer- direct quote from Augustine. To me, it seems ence for the story is correct’. As anyone famil- likely that Nashe found the phrase in iar with McKerrow’s edition of Nashe will note, Altensteig’s book and added a clarifying ‘in pol- correct citation was, to put it mildly, not some- lutione’; what is also added through the English thing that Nashe was overly bothered with. paraphrase is the nice touch that Nashe is citing However, Nashe may have felt it appropriate Augustine directly. Such a practice is certainly to draw on Augustine in this text as it would familiar from other instances in Nashe’s works, have fulfilled several purposes: apart from which for example draw extensively on the refer- showing off his learning, it also would have ences and formulations in Agrippa’s Of the vanitie given Nashe the opportunity to tailor the and vncertaintie of artes and sciences (1569), as pamphlet to the preferences of his pious patron- McKerrow shows. In other words, while Nashe ess Lady Elizabeth Carey, with whom Nashe may have had exact references available for lodged on the Isle of Wight in 1593 and 1594. Augustine’s Confessions, other passages in Other citations to Augustine are less exact, Christs Tears suggest that he, used intermediaries however. A passage in Nashe’s sermon against to cite classical sources. the wicked people of London draws on what ap- PER SIVEFORS pears to be a quote from Augustine: ‘Who soeuer Linnaeus University they be that haue soules, and would in no meanes doi:10.1093/notesj/gjx216 haue them miscarry, let them remember that of The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, S. Augustine, In pollutione anima fit tota caro, In please email: journals.permissions@oup.com adulterie or fornication the soule is made all flesh, Advance Access publication 10 January, 2018 & is wholie employde in impouerishing and debil- itating the fleshe’. McKerrow is (uncharacteris- Johann Altensteig, Lexicon theologicum complectens tically) unable to find a source for the Latin vocabulorum descriptiones (Antwerp, 1576), sig. Ii3v. line and suggests a passage from Augustine’s Altensteig’s work was first published under the title Vocabularius Theologiae in 1517; the present quotation is Sermones with roughly the same meaning. from an edition closer in time to Nashe. Bernardino of Siena, Opera Quae Extant Omnia R. B. McKerrow (ed.), The Works of Thomas Nashe (Venice, 1591), II, 638. (Oxford, 1966), IV, 229. Gabriel Biel, Sacri canonis missae lucidissima expositio McKerrow, The Works of Thomas Nashe, II, 155. profundissimi (Brescia, 1576), Lectio X, 52. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/nq/article-abstract/65/1/49/4797582 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Notes and Queries Oxford University Press

A Supposed Quotation from Augustine in Thomas Nashe’s Christs Teares over Jerusalem

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Abstract

March 2018 NOTES AND QUERIES 49 in Almond fit nicely into this line of contem- However, Nashe could have found the phrase porary thought. ‘anima fit tota caro’ in Johann Altensteig’s ARUN CHETA Lexicon theologicum (a textbook that Nashe Sheffield Hallam University might possibly have used), which claims under doi:10.1093/notesj/gjx189 the heading ‘pollutio’, that ‘secundum August. The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University in hoc opere anima fit tota caro’. Another text, Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, which like Nashe and Altensteig mentions ‘pol- please email: journals.permissions@oup.com lutio’ in this connection and is even closer in time, Advance Access publication 24 January, 2018 is an edition of Bernadino of Siena’s works that suggests, ‘secundum Aug. in huiusmodi opere A SUPPOSED QUOTATION FROM anima fit tota caro, quia corruptio præualet ipsi AUGUSTINE IN THOMAS NASHE’S naturæ. De pollutione nocturna, secundum CHRISTS TEARES OVER JERUSALEM 4 Landulphum, hoc seruandum est’. The phrase UNLIKE in other works by Thomas Nashe, St ‘anima fit tota caro’ is moreover found, reference Augustine is a fairly common presence in his to Augustine and all, in the 1576 edition of the longest work, the religious pamphlet Christs German scholastic philosopher Gabriel Biel’s Teares over Jerusalem (1593). Nashe’s use of Sacri canonis missae expositio. While it would the church father in this text may be unsurpris- be beyond the scope of this note to establish ing considering the religious fervour that perme- who borrowed from whom in these editions or ates Christs Teares. In fact, in at least one case, whether they had one single source in common, Nashe cites Augustine’s Confessions exactly it can be observed that none of them actually sug- enough for his early twentieth-century editor gests that the phrase ‘anima fit tota caro’ is a R. B. McKerrow to curtly note that ‘the refer- direct quote from Augustine. To me, it seems ence for the story is correct’. As anyone famil- likely that Nashe found the phrase in iar with McKerrow’s edition of Nashe will note, Altensteig’s book and added a clarifying ‘in pol- correct citation was, to put it mildly, not some- lutione’; what is also added through the English thing that Nashe was overly bothered with. paraphrase is the nice touch that Nashe is citing However, Nashe may have felt it appropriate Augustine directly. Such a practice is certainly to draw on Augustine in this text as it would familiar from other instances in Nashe’s works, have fulfilled several purposes: apart from which for example draw extensively on the refer- showing off his learning, it also would have ences and formulations in Agrippa’s Of the vanitie given Nashe the opportunity to tailor the and vncertaintie of artes and sciences (1569), as pamphlet to the preferences of his pious patron- McKerrow shows. In other words, while Nashe ess Lady Elizabeth Carey, with whom Nashe may have had exact references available for lodged on the Isle of Wight in 1593 and 1594. Augustine’s Confessions, other passages in Other citations to Augustine are less exact, Christs Tears suggest that he, used intermediaries however. A passage in Nashe’s sermon against to cite classical sources. the wicked people of London draws on what ap- PER SIVEFORS pears to be a quote from Augustine: ‘Who soeuer Linnaeus University they be that haue soules, and would in no meanes doi:10.1093/notesj/gjx216 haue them miscarry, let them remember that of The Author(s) (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, S. Augustine, In pollutione anima fit tota caro, In please email: journals.permissions@oup.com adulterie or fornication the soule is made all flesh, Advance Access publication 10 January, 2018 & is wholie employde in impouerishing and debil- itating the fleshe’. McKerrow is (uncharacteris- Johann Altensteig, Lexicon theologicum complectens tically) unable to find a source for the Latin vocabulorum descriptiones (Antwerp, 1576), sig. Ii3v. line and suggests a passage from Augustine’s Altensteig’s work was first published under the title Vocabularius Theologiae in 1517; the present quotation is Sermones with roughly the same meaning. from an edition closer in time to Nashe. Bernardino of Siena, Opera Quae Extant Omnia R. B. McKerrow (ed.), The Works of Thomas Nashe (Venice, 1591), II, 638. (Oxford, 1966), IV, 229. Gabriel Biel, Sacri canonis missae lucidissima expositio McKerrow, The Works of Thomas Nashe, II, 155. profundissimi (Brescia, 1576), Lectio X, 52. Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/nq/article-abstract/65/1/49/4797582 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 16 March 2018

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Notes and QueriesOxford University Press

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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