A mechanism of nitric oxide regulation in high-altitude Tibetans

A mechanism of nitric oxide regulation in high-altitude Tibetans National Science Review 0: 1, 2018 COMMENTARY doi: 10.1093/nsr/nwy040 Advance access publication 28 March 2018 In the paper of He et al. [1], the authors unveiled an impor- As the authors also mentioned in the manuscript, they did tant mechanism of nitric oxide regulation in Tibetans under not examine the exhaled NO in their population samples. It is high-altitude hypoxia, which might be valuable in understand- reasonable, based on the observation of previous studies, to as- ing the altitudinal adaption of Tibetan people. In particular, the sume the blood NOx reflects a local regulation in the lung. The authors overturned the previous proposal of a Tibetan-specific only potential risk is that the magnitude of the variance between NOx up-regulation as an adaptive strategy to high-altitude hy- the blood NOx and the exhaled NO levels could be statistically poxia and proposed that the NOx up-regulation is probably a close to that between populations. common physiological response to hypoxia for general popu- Another interesting observation in this paper is the between- lations, including both Tibetan and Han Chinese. I am con- gender difference at 4802 m—that is, males exhibited a higher vinced by many lines of evidence presented in the manuscript NOx level than females at that elevation. In particular, the dif- and I would like to commend the authors for an inspiring ference observed is in the opposite direction compared to a pre- paper. vious study that reported higher NOx levels in Tibetan females One strength of this study is that the authors collected and compared to Tibetan males. As only the sum of nitrate and ni- analysed the largest population sample for blood NOx analysis trite was measured in this paper, a fair comparative analysis is and, in particular, for the first time, Tibetans living at low alti- not applicable at this time. Further study is necessary to resolve these incompatible observations. tude and lowlanders (Han Chinese) living at high altitude were analysed. But it is a pity that the NOx data were not available for Han Chinese above 4500 m. It is possible to collect data from Shuhua Xu those mountaineers from mt. Everest base camp (∼5200 m), of CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology (PICB), whom many are Han Chinese, although some bias might be in- Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS, China troduced, as they are not permanent residents and they are not Reviewer of NSR random samples. However, according to the study, the elevated E-mail: xushua@picb.ac.cn NOx level can be maintained for a long period of time in both na- tive Tibetans and lowlanders moving to high altitudes, and ‘the duration of residence time has no obvious effect on blood NOx REFERENCE level’. I believe the data would be valuable if they are available in the future. 1. He YX, Qi XB and Ouzhuluobu et al. Natl Sci Rev 2018; doi: 10.1093/nsr/nwy037. The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of China Science Publishing & Media Ltd. All rights reserved. For permissions, plea se e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/nsr/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/nsr/nwy040/4956056 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 08 June 2018 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png National Science Review Oxford University Press

A mechanism of nitric oxide regulation in high-altitude Tibetans

National Science Review , Volume Advance Article – Mar 28, 2018
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Oxford University Press
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© The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of China Science Publishing & Media Ltd.
ISSN
2095-5138
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2053-714X
D.O.I.
10.1093/nsr/nwy040
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Abstract

National Science Review 0: 1, 2018 COMMENTARY doi: 10.1093/nsr/nwy040 Advance access publication 28 March 2018 In the paper of He et al. [1], the authors unveiled an impor- As the authors also mentioned in the manuscript, they did tant mechanism of nitric oxide regulation in Tibetans under not examine the exhaled NO in their population samples. It is high-altitude hypoxia, which might be valuable in understand- reasonable, based on the observation of previous studies, to as- ing the altitudinal adaption of Tibetan people. In particular, the sume the blood NOx reflects a local regulation in the lung. The authors overturned the previous proposal of a Tibetan-specific only potential risk is that the magnitude of the variance between NOx up-regulation as an adaptive strategy to high-altitude hy- the blood NOx and the exhaled NO levels could be statistically poxia and proposed that the NOx up-regulation is probably a close to that between populations. common physiological response to hypoxia for general popu- Another interesting observation in this paper is the between- lations, including both Tibetan and Han Chinese. I am con- gender difference at 4802 m—that is, males exhibited a higher vinced by many lines of evidence presented in the manuscript NOx level than females at that elevation. In particular, the dif- and I would like to commend the authors for an inspiring ference observed is in the opposite direction compared to a pre- paper. vious study that reported higher NOx levels in Tibetan females One strength of this study is that the authors collected and compared to Tibetan males. As only the sum of nitrate and ni- analysed the largest population sample for blood NOx analysis trite was measured in this paper, a fair comparative analysis is and, in particular, for the first time, Tibetans living at low alti- not applicable at this time. Further study is necessary to resolve these incompatible observations. tude and lowlanders (Han Chinese) living at high altitude were analysed. But it is a pity that the NOx data were not available for Han Chinese above 4500 m. It is possible to collect data from Shuhua Xu those mountaineers from mt. Everest base camp (∼5200 m), of CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology (PICB), whom many are Han Chinese, although some bias might be in- Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS, China troduced, as they are not permanent residents and they are not Reviewer of NSR random samples. However, according to the study, the elevated E-mail: xushua@picb.ac.cn NOx level can be maintained for a long period of time in both na- tive Tibetans and lowlanders moving to high altitudes, and ‘the duration of residence time has no obvious effect on blood NOx REFERENCE level’. I believe the data would be valuable if they are available in the future. 1. He YX, Qi XB and Ouzhuluobu et al. Natl Sci Rev 2018; doi: 10.1093/nsr/nwy037. The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of China Science Publishing & Media Ltd. All rights reserved. For permissions, plea se e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/nsr/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/nsr/nwy040/4956056 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 08 June 2018

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National Science ReviewOxford University Press

Published: Mar 28, 2018

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