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One Seder Evening

One Seder Evening Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/litimag/article-abstract/20/3/253/5210861 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 11 January 2019 SZILARD BORBELY One Seder evening, the rabbis were discussing atonement. After a long silence, Reb Teitelbaum commented that Cain had been plotting to kill Abel for a long time. He didn’t slay him from sudden passion. The murder took place on the Sabbath, because Cain wanted to desecrate all of Creation. And with this murder he could prove that the Lord has no power over human beings, because anyone can take a life. Cain struck the Sabbath first, with his axe. Then he beat Abel’s skull, his blows ever heavier, until it broke apart in pieces. When he stopped, you couldn’t tell it was Abel anymore. Midnight had already passed, when Cain laid down his axe. Cold were the vaults of Heaven, the stars shone bright in the sky. They went with the Sabbath as it fled. —translated from the original Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet. Literary Imagination, volume 20, number 3, p. 253 doi:10.1093/litimag/imy040 Advance Access Publication November 27, 2018 Excerpted from FINAL MATTERS: Selected Poems, 2004–2010 by Szil ard Borb ely, translated by Ottilie Mulzet. English language copyright  2018 by Princeton University Press. The original poems collected and translated in this volume are selected from the published collections Halotti pompa: Szekvenci ak, 2nd ed. (Bratislava: Kalligram, 2006) and A Testhez: Od ak  es legend ak (Bratislava: Kalligram, 2010). Reprinted by permission of Princeton University Press http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Literary Imagination Oxford University Press

One Seder Evening

Literary Imagination , Volume 20 (3) – Nov 1, 2018

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Publisher
Oxford University Press
Copyright
Excerpted from FINAL MATTERS: Selected Poems, 2004–2010 by Szilárd Borbély, translated by Ottilie Mulzet. English language copyright © 2018 by Princeton University Press. The original poems collected and translated in this volume are selected from the published collections Halotti pompa: Szekvenciák, 2nd ed. (Bratislava: Kalligram, 2006) and A Testhez: Ódák és legendák (Bratislava: Kalligram, 2010). Reprinted by permission of Princeton University Press
ISSN
1523-9012
eISSN
1752-6566
DOI
10.1093/litimag/imy040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Downloaded from https://academic.oup.com/litimag/article-abstract/20/3/253/5210861 by Ed 'DeepDyve' Gillespie user on 11 January 2019 SZILARD BORBELY One Seder evening, the rabbis were discussing atonement. After a long silence, Reb Teitelbaum commented that Cain had been plotting to kill Abel for a long time. He didn’t slay him from sudden passion. The murder took place on the Sabbath, because Cain wanted to desecrate all of Creation. And with this murder he could prove that the Lord has no power over human beings, because anyone can take a life. Cain struck the Sabbath first, with his axe. Then he beat Abel’s skull, his blows ever heavier, until it broke apart in pieces. When he stopped, you couldn’t tell it was Abel anymore. Midnight had already passed, when Cain laid down his axe. Cold were the vaults of Heaven, the stars shone bright in the sky. They went with the Sabbath as it fled. —translated from the original Hungarian by Ottilie Mulzet. Literary Imagination, volume 20, number 3, p. 253 doi:10.1093/litimag/imy040 Advance Access Publication November 27, 2018 Excerpted from FINAL MATTERS: Selected Poems, 2004–2010 by Szil ard Borb ely, translated by Ottilie Mulzet. English language copyright  2018 by Princeton University Press. The original poems collected and translated in this volume are selected from the published collections Halotti pompa: Szekvenci ak, 2nd ed. (Bratislava: Kalligram, 2006) and A Testhez: Od ak  es legend ak (Bratislava: Kalligram, 2010). Reprinted by permission of Princeton University Press

Journal

Literary ImaginationOxford University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2018

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