Radio sweat gland - 90 GHz

Radio sweat gland - 90 GHz Sweat ducts in human skin act like an array of tiny antennas that pick up radiation at specific frequencies, according to researchers. The finding might one day be used in medical and security technologies to assess a person's mental state from a distance. A team of researchers in Israel has shown that sweat ducts pick up radiation at frequencies of about 100 gigahertz — the so-called extremely high frequency or EHF range, lying between microwaves and terahertz radiation. The antenna behaviour is all down to the ducts' curious shape: they thread through the epidermis as regular helices. Filled with electrically conductive sweat, these channels act rather like coils of wire that absorb radiation across the millimetre and sub-millimetre wavelength band. Yuri Feldman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and his colleagues directed a beam of EHF radiation onto the skin of the palms of subjects who had been jogging for 20 minutes, and measured the radiation that was reflected back. They found a strong band of absorption that was not seen before exercise. This absorption gradually disappeared as the subjects rested after jogging (Y. Feldman et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 128102; 2008). The researchers also found that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Nature Publishing Group (NPG)

Radio sweat gland - 90 GHz

Nature , Volume 452 (7188) – Apr 9, 2008

Radio sweat gland - 90 GHz

Abstract

Sweat ducts in human skin act like an array of tiny antennas that pick up radiation at specific frequencies, according to researchers. The finding might one day be used in medical and security technologies to assess a person's mental state from a distance. A team of researchers in Israel has shown that sweat ducts pick up radiation at frequencies of about 100 gigahertz — the so-called extremely high frequency or EHF range, lying between microwaves and terahertz radiation. The...
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Publisher
Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Nature Publishing Group
ISSN
0028-0836
eISSN
1476-4687
D.O.I.
10.1038/452676a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sweat ducts in human skin act like an array of tiny antennas that pick up radiation at specific frequencies, according to researchers. The finding might one day be used in medical and security technologies to assess a person's mental state from a distance. A team of researchers in Israel has shown that sweat ducts pick up radiation at frequencies of about 100 gigahertz — the so-called extremely high frequency or EHF range, lying between microwaves and terahertz radiation. The antenna behaviour is all down to the ducts' curious shape: they thread through the epidermis as regular helices. Filled with electrically conductive sweat, these channels act rather like coils of wire that absorb radiation across the millimetre and sub-millimetre wavelength band. Yuri Feldman of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and his colleagues directed a beam of EHF radiation onto the skin of the palms of subjects who had been jogging for 20 minutes, and measured the radiation that was reflected back. They found a strong band of absorption that was not seen before exercise. This absorption gradually disappeared as the subjects rested after jogging (Y. Feldman et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 128102; 2008). The researchers also found that

Journal

NatureNature Publishing Group (NPG)

Published: Apr 9, 2008

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