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"Why Ask My Name?" Anonymity and Identity in Biblical Narrative (review)

"Why Ask My Name?" Anonymity and Identity in Biblical Narrative (review) Hebrew Studies 41 (2000) Reviews "WHY ASK MY NAME?" ANONYMITY AND IDENTITY IN BIBLICAL NARRA TIVE. By Adele Reinhartz. pp. xii + 226. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998. Cloth, $39.95. Adele Reinhartz's study of unnamed characters in Hebrew Bible narrative serves two purposes: to introduce these diverse figures to other readers of biblical narrative and to explore the interplay between anonymity and identity initiated in the reader's encounter with the unnamed. Three features of this interplay are taken into account by Reinhartz: the ways in which anonymity veils or effaces identity in characters; the ways in which identity of the anonymous emerges nevertheless; the ways in which anonymity blurs boundaries (she explores the permeability of identity among unnamed characters, between named and unnamed, between human and divine, between angels and God, and between reader and text). Among the unnamed biblical characters encountered in Reinhartz's book are bit players (including personal attendants and purveyors of information); characters defmed by their roles; female characters whose portrayal tests the boundaries of their stereotypical roles of wife, mother, and daughter; and inhabitants of the heavenly realm, among others. Methodically, Reinhartz surveys the variety of unnamed characters in Hebrew Bible narrative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

"Why Ask My Name?" Anonymity and Identity in Biblical Narrative (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 41 (1) – Oct 5, 2000

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

Hebrew Studies 41 (2000) Reviews "WHY ASK MY NAME?" ANONYMITY AND IDENTITY IN BIBLICAL NARRA TIVE. By Adele Reinhartz. pp. xii + 226. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998. Cloth, $39.95. Adele Reinhartz's study of unnamed characters in Hebrew Bible narrative serves two purposes: to introduce these diverse figures to other readers of biblical narrative and to explore the interplay between anonymity and identity initiated in the reader's encounter with the unnamed. Three features of this interplay are taken into account by Reinhartz: the ways in which anonymity veils or effaces identity in characters; the ways in which identity of the anonymous emerges nevertheless; the ways in which anonymity blurs boundaries (she explores the permeability of identity among unnamed characters, between named and unnamed, between human and divine, between angels and God, and between reader and text). Among the unnamed biblical characters encountered in Reinhartz's book are bit players (including personal attendants and purveyors of information); characters defmed by their roles; female characters whose portrayal tests the boundaries of their stereotypical roles of wife, mother, and daughter; and inhabitants of the heavenly realm, among others. Methodically, Reinhartz surveys the variety of unnamed characters in Hebrew Bible narrative

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2000

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