Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Tradition History and the Psalms of Asaph (review)

Tradition History and the Psalms of Asaph (review) explaining to the reader the complexities of the Brennerian style and structure. His deftness in sensing the textual topography is shown clearly in his remarks concerning the four-chapter ending of In Winter. [T)hese chapters [offer] examples of the kind of writing in which Brenner chose not to compose In Winter. The chapters describe two extreme and opposing dispositions of the narrative consciousness, the one sardonic and moribund and the other abandoned and exultant Rather than disclosing the ultimate meaning of Feuennan's ordeal, they offer insights into what the novel cannot be about and remain a novel. (p. 200) Mintz has chosen a most significant genre and period of Hebrew writing and has produced a superbly adroit and insightful study of the major works. Although the issue of the loss of religious faith is for the most part a dormant topic in modem Hebrew literature, parallel issues of alienation and ideological apostasy, so to speak, are still featured. In this sense the political works of several Israeli writers-Yizhar, Megged, Oz, Yehoshua, Amichai, Kaniuk, Kenan, and Grossman, to name a few-have replaced the autobiography as the medium for a number of contemporary torments. Warren Bargad University of Florida Gainesville, FL http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Tradition History and the Psalms of Asaph (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 33 (1) – Oct 5, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/tradition-history-and-the-psalms-of-asaph-review-7Yo8fWCiba
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

explaining to the reader the complexities of the Brennerian style and structure. His deftness in sensing the textual topography is shown clearly in his remarks concerning the four-chapter ending of In Winter. [T)hese chapters [offer] examples of the kind of writing in which Brenner chose not to compose In Winter. The chapters describe two extreme and opposing dispositions of the narrative consciousness, the one sardonic and moribund and the other abandoned and exultant Rather than disclosing the ultimate meaning of Feuennan's ordeal, they offer insights into what the novel cannot be about and remain a novel. (p. 200) Mintz has chosen a most significant genre and period of Hebrew writing and has produced a superbly adroit and insightful study of the major works. Although the issue of the loss of religious faith is for the most part a dormant topic in modem Hebrew literature, parallel issues of alienation and ideological apostasy, so to speak, are still featured. In this sense the political works of several Israeli writers-Yizhar, Megged, Oz, Yehoshua, Amichai, Kaniuk, Kenan, and Grossman, to name a few-have replaced the autobiography as the medium for a number of contemporary torments. Warren Bargad University of Florida Gainesville, FL

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1992

There are no references for this article.