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They Call You the Parisian: On Thera by Zeruya Shalev

They Call You the Parisian: On Thera by Zeruya Shalev Abstract: Zeruya Shalev writes on marital crises through the prism of Jewish legends and Greek myths on catastrophic themes. The destruction of the Second Temple, the rift between the biblical Kingdom of Israel and the Kingdom of Judea, and an ancient earthquake that decimates an entire civilization serve as analogies to events in the personal lives of her characters. The article examines Shalev’s novel Thera , whose protagonists are archeologists married to one another, and Wilhelm Jensen’s Gardiva: A Pompeiian Fancy (1903)—whose protagonist is also an archeologist, who received a fascinating treatment in Sigmund Freud’s Delusion and Dream in Wilhelm Jensen’s Gardiva (1907). Both Shalev’s Thera and Jensen’s Gardiva use an ancient artwork related to a cataclysmic natural disaster to stimulate the male protagonist’s falling in love with a woman. The scientific archeological investigation serves as an excuse, camouflage, and metaphor for real life taking place in the present. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

They Call You the Parisian: On Thera by Zeruya Shalev

Hebrew Studies , Volume 55 (1) – Dec 12, 2014

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Zeruya Shalev writes on marital crises through the prism of Jewish legends and Greek myths on catastrophic themes. The destruction of the Second Temple, the rift between the biblical Kingdom of Israel and the Kingdom of Judea, and an ancient earthquake that decimates an entire civilization serve as analogies to events in the personal lives of her characters. The article examines Shalev’s novel Thera , whose protagonists are archeologists married to one another, and Wilhelm Jensen’s Gardiva: A Pompeiian Fancy (1903)—whose protagonist is also an archeologist, who received a fascinating treatment in Sigmund Freud’s Delusion and Dream in Wilhelm Jensen’s Gardiva (1907). Both Shalev’s Thera and Jensen’s Gardiva use an ancient artwork related to a cataclysmic natural disaster to stimulate the male protagonist’s falling in love with a woman. The scientific archeological investigation serves as an excuse, camouflage, and metaphor for real life taking place in the present.

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Dec 12, 2014

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