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The Redaction of the Babylonian Talmud: Amoraic or Saboraic? (review)

The Redaction of the Babylonian Talmud: Amoraic or Saboraic? (review) the process leading to symbol, myth, ritual, and theory. In his introductory essay written for a conference on the theories of Rene Girard, Walter Burkert, and Jonathan Z. Smith, Burton Mack points out that all three tend "to grant privilege to ritual (or event) as the generator of symbols and myths" ("Introduction: Religion and Ritual," in Violent Origins. Robert Hamerton-Kelly, ed., [Stanford, 1987]. pp. 51-52). Mack goes on to make the strong claim that future studies dealing with the various forms and expressions of religion must attend to primary acts and their ritualization. No longer does an epiphamc object or being focus the picture for the religious imagination, providing a center around which a Sacred Order is orgamzed by means of a system of symbols. Instead, an act (action, activity; Uor Burkert the primitive hunr,for Girard the origin ofsacrifice in primitive violence)) has been noticed as a transaction of consequence, reflected on as patterned sequence, and cultivated in rilUlll as of prime importance (pp. 58-59, emphasis his). Myth-and by extension any kind of narrative text-will no longer be given theoretical preference over ritual reenactment of primary acts. Josipovici comes close to this view in the primacy he grants http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

The Redaction of the Babylonian Talmud: Amoraic or Saboraic? (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Oct 5, 1990

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

the process leading to symbol, myth, ritual, and theory. In his introductory essay written for a conference on the theories of Rene Girard, Walter Burkert, and Jonathan Z. Smith, Burton Mack points out that all three tend "to grant privilege to ritual (or event) as the generator of symbols and myths" ("Introduction: Religion and Ritual," in Violent Origins. Robert Hamerton-Kelly, ed., [Stanford, 1987]. pp. 51-52). Mack goes on to make the strong claim that future studies dealing with the various forms and expressions of religion must attend to primary acts and their ritualization. No longer does an epiphamc object or being focus the picture for the religious imagination, providing a center around which a Sacred Order is orgamzed by means of a system of symbols. Instead, an act (action, activity; Uor Burkert the primitive hunr,for Girard the origin ofsacrifice in primitive violence)) has been noticed as a transaction of consequence, reflected on as patterned sequence, and cultivated in rilUlll as of prime importance (pp. 58-59, emphasis his). Myth-and by extension any kind of narrative text-will no longer be given theoretical preference over ritual reenactment of primary acts. Josipovici comes close to this view in the primacy he grants

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1990

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