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The Hebrew Bible Today: An Introduction to Critical Issues (review)

The Hebrew Bible Today: An Introduction to Critical Issues (review) only one example is extant, not accepting the correspondences would be safer, no matter how clear the identification seems. The dictum that "one example is no example" certainly holds for the comparative study of languages. The fmal chapter of the book offers his conclusions, including a summary of the consonantal correspondences established. There is a section on phonetic changes in the Egyptian language related to North-West Semitic phonetic changes, such as assimilation and the loss of certain consonants. Muchiki also provides a quantitative analysis of Egyptian loanwords into Hebrew and Aramaic by their semantic group, plus an attempt to determine when certain Egyptian words were adopted into Hebrew. A fmal section tries to discern the amount of Egyptian religious influence on the different North-West Semitic groups by noting the distribution of Egyptian gods in personal names. Not surprisingly, Phoenician exhibits the largest concentration of Egyptian divine elements, while Hebrew shows the smallest. Despite the reservations noted above, the book is a very good study and a handy resource. Indexes to Egyptian words add to its usefulness. Kevin A. Wilson Johns Hopkins University Sunderland, MD 20689 kwilson@jhu.edu THE HEBREW BIBLE TODAY: AN INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL ISSUES. Steven L. McKenzie http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

The Hebrew Bible Today: An Introduction to Critical Issues (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 41 (1) – Oct 5, 2000

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

only one example is extant, not accepting the correspondences would be safer, no matter how clear the identification seems. The dictum that "one example is no example" certainly holds for the comparative study of languages. The fmal chapter of the book offers his conclusions, including a summary of the consonantal correspondences established. There is a section on phonetic changes in the Egyptian language related to North-West Semitic phonetic changes, such as assimilation and the loss of certain consonants. Muchiki also provides a quantitative analysis of Egyptian loanwords into Hebrew and Aramaic by their semantic group, plus an attempt to determine when certain Egyptian words were adopted into Hebrew. A fmal section tries to discern the amount of Egyptian religious influence on the different North-West Semitic groups by noting the distribution of Egyptian gods in personal names. Not surprisingly, Phoenician exhibits the largest concentration of Egyptian divine elements, while Hebrew shows the smallest. Despite the reservations noted above, the book is a very good study and a handy resource. Indexes to Egyptian words add to its usefulness. Kevin A. Wilson Johns Hopkins University Sunderland, MD 20689 kwilson@jhu.edu THE HEBREW BIBLE TODAY: AN INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL ISSUES. Steven L. McKenzie

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2000

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