Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Grammar of Social Gender in Biblical Hebrew

The Grammar of Social Gender in Biblical Hebrew <i>When does the Hebrew Bible&apos;s masculine or "male" wording allow for women to be in view?</i> This paper addresses that question via a philological (inductive) approach, taking the biblical corpus as a whole and distilling the rules of its linguistic system according to a plain-sense reading of the text. The investigation focuses on what the biblical text seems to expect of its readers with regard to construing the social-gender import of three linguistic usages: second-person masculine singular address; third-person masculine singular references; and "male" nouns (i.e., those with specifically female counterparts), including אִיש, אָב, אָח and בּן It finds that women may be in view given any of these types of language. For all of the usages discussed, this paper supplements or supersedes the standard grammars; it also touches on several implications for translation and exegesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

The Grammar of Social Gender in Biblical Hebrew

Hebrew Studies , Volume 49 – Oct 5, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/the-grammar-of-social-gender-in-biblical-hebrew-x2etYP5AXE
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

<i>When does the Hebrew Bible&apos;s masculine or "male" wording allow for women to be in view?</i> This paper addresses that question via a philological (inductive) approach, taking the biblical corpus as a whole and distilling the rules of its linguistic system according to a plain-sense reading of the text. The investigation focuses on what the biblical text seems to expect of its readers with regard to construing the social-gender import of three linguistic usages: second-person masculine singular address; third-person masculine singular references; and "male" nouns (i.e., those with specifically female counterparts), including אִיש, אָב, אָח and בּן It finds that women may be in view given any of these types of language. For all of the usages discussed, this paper supplements or supersedes the standard grammars; it also touches on several implications for translation and exegesis.

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

There are no references for this article.