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The Curse of Cain: The Violent Legacy of Monotheism (review)

The Curse of Cain: The Violent Legacy of Monotheism (review) The material on early Christianity seeks to present Jesus and Paul as less hostile to women than is commonly thought; but those accolades are distributed at the cost of denigrating the Jewish culture from which both males arise. Similarly. McKenzie reminds us that Jesus (or perhaps an evangelist?) employs imagery of all genders (masculine, feminine and neuter) to make assertions about himself, but then suggests that the implication is of androgyny. It is too big a leap from too slim a methodological base. McKenzie advises her readers that she was warned that her book is dangerous, and she invites the curious to find out why (p. vii). Though she obviously cares deeply about her subject and has devoted years to her quest for readings helpful to women, the present reviewer finds it dangerous for the vast oversimplifications at every level. Barbara Green Dominican Schaol. Graduate Theological Union Berkeley, CA 94709 110235,361 J@compuserve.com THE CURSE OF CAIN: THE VIOLENT LEGACY OF MONO· THEISM. By Regina M. Schwartz. Pp. xv + 211. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997. Cloth, $22.95. The Curse of Cain: The Violent Legacy of Monotheism is a brilliant analysis of the relationship between violence and the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

The Curse of Cain: The Violent Legacy of Monotheism (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 39 (1) – Oct 5, 1998

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

The material on early Christianity seeks to present Jesus and Paul as less hostile to women than is commonly thought; but those accolades are distributed at the cost of denigrating the Jewish culture from which both males arise. Similarly. McKenzie reminds us that Jesus (or perhaps an evangelist?) employs imagery of all genders (masculine, feminine and neuter) to make assertions about himself, but then suggests that the implication is of androgyny. It is too big a leap from too slim a methodological base. McKenzie advises her readers that she was warned that her book is dangerous, and she invites the curious to find out why (p. vii). Though she obviously cares deeply about her subject and has devoted years to her quest for readings helpful to women, the present reviewer finds it dangerous for the vast oversimplifications at every level. Barbara Green Dominican Schaol. Graduate Theological Union Berkeley, CA 94709 110235,361 J@compuserve.com THE CURSE OF CAIN: THE VIOLENT LEGACY OF MONO· THEISM. By Regina M. Schwartz. Pp. xv + 211. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997. Cloth, $22.95. The Curse of Cain: The Violent Legacy of Monotheism is a brilliant analysis of the relationship between violence and the

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1998

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