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The Ancient Library of Qumran (review)

The Ancient Library of Qumran (review) critical editions of Greek and Latin authors. Rather, he cites the Loeb Classical Library texts (bilingual edition) or the Penguin (English) translations. And, although he does list some primary sources in the "Epigraphic and Documentary Sources," he includes several compilations of translated or bilingual excerpts (e.g., Reinach; Stem; Sherk). Additionally, his citations for the earlier historical background are deficient, insofar as he cites Appian for second century material without citing Polybius or Livy, where extant. Moreover, he ignores such basic modem references as Pauly's Real-Encyclopiidie der c1assischen Altertumswissenscha!t (Stuttgart, 1893-), and such scholars as Mommsen, Niese, Rostovtzeff, T. Frank, and Badian, to name only a few. Despite these flaws, the work is worth reading. Some chapters such as two and eight in particular, are extremely well done. And, most importantly, Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans does give the reader a "feel" for Herod the man, as well as for Herod's accomplishments. Sara Mandell The University of South Florida Tampa. FL 33620 smandell@email.msn.com THE ANCIENT LIBRARY OF QUMRAN. By Frank M. Cross. Pp. 204. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995. Paper. This updated version of Cross' book is a classical exposition of the Qumran-Essene-Hasmonean hypothesis regarding http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

The Ancient Library of Qumran (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 39 (1) – Oct 5, 1998

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National Association of Professors of Hebrew
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Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
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2158-1681
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Abstract

critical editions of Greek and Latin authors. Rather, he cites the Loeb Classical Library texts (bilingual edition) or the Penguin (English) translations. And, although he does list some primary sources in the "Epigraphic and Documentary Sources," he includes several compilations of translated or bilingual excerpts (e.g., Reinach; Stem; Sherk). Additionally, his citations for the earlier historical background are deficient, insofar as he cites Appian for second century material without citing Polybius or Livy, where extant. Moreover, he ignores such basic modem references as Pauly's Real-Encyclopiidie der c1assischen Altertumswissenscha!t (Stuttgart, 1893-), and such scholars as Mommsen, Niese, Rostovtzeff, T. Frank, and Badian, to name only a few. Despite these flaws, the work is worth reading. Some chapters such as two and eight in particular, are extremely well done. And, most importantly, Herod: King of the Jews and Friend of the Romans does give the reader a "feel" for Herod the man, as well as for Herod's accomplishments. Sara Mandell The University of South Florida Tampa. FL 33620 smandell@email.msn.com THE ANCIENT LIBRARY OF QUMRAN. By Frank M. Cross. Pp. 204. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1995. Paper. This updated version of Cross' book is a classical exposition of the Qumran-Essene-Hasmonean hypothesis regarding

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1998

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