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Temples, Tithes, and Taxes: The Temple and the Economic Life of Ancient Israel (review)

Temples, Tithes, and Taxes: The Temple and the Economic Life of Ancient Israel (review) Temples, Tithes, and Taxes: The Temple and the Economic Life of Ancient Israel (review) Lester L. Grabbe Hebrew Studies, Volume 49, 2008, pp. 349-352 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.2008.0000 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/439563/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:34 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 49 (2008) 349 Reviews shows, she means that hereditary hierarchy is less palatable in a sectarian framework, where people choose to belong, and that is indeed a reasonable statement, a priori, one that makes sense of why one group would tend to one position and another group to another position. But when we look at the sources, we find that while the Rule of the Community contains the famous passage in cols. 3–4 about Sons of Light and Sons of Darkness, which in- deed ignores pedigree, it also contains, at 8:5–9 and 9:3–6, some equally fa- mous and strident statements about the priests being “most holy” while Israel is only “holy,” of which the practical implication is that “Only the sons of Aaron shall rule in mattes of justice and property, and on their word the decision shall be taken with regard to every http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Temples, Tithes, and Taxes: The Temple and the Economic Life of Ancient Israel (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 49 – Oct 5, 2011

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

Temples, Tithes, and Taxes: The Temple and the Economic Life of Ancient Israel (review) Lester L. Grabbe Hebrew Studies, Volume 49, 2008, pp. 349-352 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.2008.0000 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/439563/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:34 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 49 (2008) 349 Reviews shows, she means that hereditary hierarchy is less palatable in a sectarian framework, where people choose to belong, and that is indeed a reasonable statement, a priori, one that makes sense of why one group would tend to one position and another group to another position. But when we look at the sources, we find that while the Rule of the Community contains the famous passage in cols. 3–4 about Sons of Light and Sons of Darkness, which in- deed ignores pedigree, it also contains, at 8:5–9 and 9:3–6, some equally fa- mous and strident statements about the priests being “most holy” while Israel is only “holy,” of which the practical implication is that “Only the sons of Aaron shall rule in mattes of justice and property, and on their word the decision shall be taken with regard to every

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

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