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Telling and Retelling: Quotation in Biblical Narrative (review)

Telling and Retelling: Quotation in Biblical Narrative (review) to the growing debate on the nature and composition of biblical narrative and how it can be read. Elizabeth Bellefontaine Mount Saint Vincent University Halifax, Nova Scotia B3M 2J6 TELLING AND RETELLING: QUOTATION IN BIBLICAL NARRATIVE. By George W. Savran. Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature. pp. xii + 161. Bloomington: Indiana University, 1988. Cloth. Proverbs 30:5 admonishes, "Do not add to [God's] words, lest he indict you and you be proved a liar" (NJPS). A well-known midrash cites this verse against Eve, who augmented God's commandment not to eat from a certain tree under penalty of death (Gen 2:17) with a prohibition against touching it (Gen 3:3). Eve's misrepresentation or embellishment of God's injunction (which had been conveyed to her in a manner unknown to us) provided the serpent with a perfect means of deceiving her: "When he saw her passing in front of the tree, he grabbed her and pushed her into it. Then he said to her, 'See, you have not died! Just as you have not died from touching it, so you shall not die from eating it'" (Gen. Rab. 19.3). The discrepancies between God's and Eve's versions of the commandment, so cleverly worked out http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Telling and Retelling: Quotation in Biblical Narrative (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 31 (1) – Oct 5, 1990

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

to the growing debate on the nature and composition of biblical narrative and how it can be read. Elizabeth Bellefontaine Mount Saint Vincent University Halifax, Nova Scotia B3M 2J6 TELLING AND RETELLING: QUOTATION IN BIBLICAL NARRATIVE. By George W. Savran. Indiana Studies in Biblical Literature. pp. xii + 161. Bloomington: Indiana University, 1988. Cloth. Proverbs 30:5 admonishes, "Do not add to [God's] words, lest he indict you and you be proved a liar" (NJPS). A well-known midrash cites this verse against Eve, who augmented God's commandment not to eat from a certain tree under penalty of death (Gen 2:17) with a prohibition against touching it (Gen 3:3). Eve's misrepresentation or embellishment of God's injunction (which had been conveyed to her in a manner unknown to us) provided the serpent with a perfect means of deceiving her: "When he saw her passing in front of the tree, he grabbed her and pushed her into it. Then he said to her, 'See, you have not died! Just as you have not died from touching it, so you shall not die from eating it'" (Gen. Rab. 19.3). The discrepancies between God's and Eve's versions of the commandment, so cleverly worked out

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1990

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