Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Symposium Discussion Session: An Edited Transcription

Symposium Discussion Session: An Edited Transcription SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSION SESSION: AN EDITED TRANSCRIPTION* Ziony Zevit University of Judaism Zevit: There is a problem with the way quantitative terms are used in our discussions. Often, numbers are presented as if they are statistics when they are simple arithmetic expressions. Since the number of examples in many cases is a single digit, presenting them as statistics doesn't mean much. For example, fifteen percent of five examples doesn't mean much, and fifteen percent of thirty means little, but fifteen percent of one hundred may have greater relevance. When we work with the Bible we deal with a closed, limited corpus of texts and can supply complete numbers. Therefore, rather than use the expressions "common or uncommon, high or low proportions," why not supply the actual numbers, say twelve examples of phenomenon X in the whole Bible or in a particular book, twenty of verbal form Y, and thirteen of noun Z? Question: Is there any way we can control statistics more insofar as literary genre or the topic of discussion in a text goes? For example, if 2 m.s. forms don't appear often in a text, could it be because we wouldn't expect 2 m.s. forms in that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Symposium Discussion Session: An Edited Transcription

Hebrew Studies , Volume 46 (1) – Oct 5, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/symposium-discussion-session-an-edited-transcription-rnsbwmItbR
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSION SESSION: AN EDITED TRANSCRIPTION* Ziony Zevit University of Judaism Zevit: There is a problem with the way quantitative terms are used in our discussions. Often, numbers are presented as if they are statistics when they are simple arithmetic expressions. Since the number of examples in many cases is a single digit, presenting them as statistics doesn't mean much. For example, fifteen percent of five examples doesn't mean much, and fifteen percent of thirty means little, but fifteen percent of one hundred may have greater relevance. When we work with the Bible we deal with a closed, limited corpus of texts and can supply complete numbers. Therefore, rather than use the expressions "common or uncommon, high or low proportions," why not supply the actual numbers, say twelve examples of phenomenon X in the whole Bible or in a particular book, twenty of verbal form Y, and thirteen of noun Z? Question: Is there any way we can control statistics more insofar as literary genre or the topic of discussion in a text goes? For example, if 2 m.s. forms don't appear often in a text, could it be because we wouldn't expect 2 m.s. forms in that

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2005

There are no references for this article.