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Semitic Studies in Memory of Moshe Held. Janes 19 (review)

Semitic Studies in Memory of Moshe Held. Janes 19 (review) In other words, he is saying that he is not interested in earlier versions of the text but is interested in the historical context from which the text was born-the linguistic context, the ideological context, etc. He reads the book of Job in its antiquity (p. 182). It is hard to fault this, but, again, what does it do to indeterminacy? Will Good admit to limits on interpretive possibilities? Well, perhaps we should not be troubled by such lack of consistency. Good certainly is not. His model of reading is "playful eroticism" (p. 180), and he ends with "The world is full of jokes. Religion is only one of them" (p. 397). He thus undermines the seriousness of his project. If he does not take himself seriously, perhaps we should not either. Adele Berlin University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 SEMITIC STUDIES IN MEMORY OF MOSHE HELD. JANES 19. Edward L. Greenstein and David Marcus, eds. Pp. viii + 181. New York: Jewish Theological Seminary, 1989. Paper. Moshe Held published relatively little during his lifetime, but his substantial contributions to ancient Near Eastern philology, through the vehicle of his students and through his presentations and responses at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Semitic Studies in Memory of Moshe Held. Janes 19 (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 33 (1) – Oct 5, 1992

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

In other words, he is saying that he is not interested in earlier versions of the text but is interested in the historical context from which the text was born-the linguistic context, the ideological context, etc. He reads the book of Job in its antiquity (p. 182). It is hard to fault this, but, again, what does it do to indeterminacy? Will Good admit to limits on interpretive possibilities? Well, perhaps we should not be troubled by such lack of consistency. Good certainly is not. His model of reading is "playful eroticism" (p. 180), and he ends with "The world is full of jokes. Religion is only one of them" (p. 397). He thus undermines the seriousness of his project. If he does not take himself seriously, perhaps we should not either. Adele Berlin University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 SEMITIC STUDIES IN MEMORY OF MOSHE HELD. JANES 19. Edward L. Greenstein and David Marcus, eds. Pp. viii + 181. New York: Jewish Theological Seminary, 1989. Paper. Moshe Held published relatively little during his lifetime, but his substantial contributions to ancient Near Eastern philology, through the vehicle of his students and through his presentations and responses at

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1992

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