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Prophetic Figures in Late Second Temple Jewish Palestine: The Evidence from Josephus (review)

Prophetic Figures in Late Second Temple Jewish Palestine: The Evidence from Josephus (review) those reading only the Hebrew). Occasionally the Isaiah verse is cited incorrectly, or differently in the text and translation (e.g., 1:3,8:8,44:12). Some readers may wish to have had more of Perez' fmdings presented in the introduction. On the other hand, the full indices of verses, sources, and topics are useful and provide ready reference to the scope of Ibn Bal'am's interests. Ibn Bal'am's commentary represents an important transitional stage in the history of Jewish Bible criticism. His forbears were Sa'adiah and Hai, I:byyuj and al-Fasi, and Arabic 'adab literature; his successors the likes of Ibn Ezra and David Kimchi. The text itself, and what is probably the most significant aspect of the notes, the comparative references to earlier and later works, contribute greatly to our understanding of the underpinnings of classic biblical commentaries, at least in the Sephardic world. The current volume does much to illustrate the approach of a representative of the heady days of the eleventh and twelfth centuries in Muslim Spain, aware of secular and religious poetry, conversant with and often critical of Geonic interpretations, and passionately excited about the new sciences of grammar and lexicography. Seth Ward University of Denver Denver, CO 80208 PROPHETIC http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Prophetic Figures in Late Second Temple Jewish Palestine: The Evidence from Josephus (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Oct 5, 1994

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
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Abstract

those reading only the Hebrew). Occasionally the Isaiah verse is cited incorrectly, or differently in the text and translation (e.g., 1:3,8:8,44:12). Some readers may wish to have had more of Perez' fmdings presented in the introduction. On the other hand, the full indices of verses, sources, and topics are useful and provide ready reference to the scope of Ibn Bal'am's interests. Ibn Bal'am's commentary represents an important transitional stage in the history of Jewish Bible criticism. His forbears were Sa'adiah and Hai, I:byyuj and al-Fasi, and Arabic 'adab literature; his successors the likes of Ibn Ezra and David Kimchi. The text itself, and what is probably the most significant aspect of the notes, the comparative references to earlier and later works, contribute greatly to our understanding of the underpinnings of classic biblical commentaries, at least in the Sephardic world. The current volume does much to illustrate the approach of a representative of the heady days of the eleventh and twelfth centuries in Muslim Spain, aware of secular and religious poetry, conversant with and often critical of Geonic interpretations, and passionately excited about the new sciences of grammar and lexicography. Seth Ward University of Denver Denver, CO 80208 PROPHETIC

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1994

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