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Prepositional Predicates with Nominalized Subjects in Classical Hebrew

Prepositional Predicates with Nominalized Subjects in Classical Hebrew <p>Abstract:</p><p>The paper characterizes the PP–nominal (prepositional phrase + nominalization) pattern in Biblical Hebrew and Rabbinic Hebrew (e.g., &apos;it is our duty to do&apos;) and discusses its relation to the so-called evaluative or pattern (e.g., &apos;it would have been better for us to serve&apos;). In spite of the resemblance between the two, it is argued that the former is a distinct pattern both historically and typologically, but that both share similar generalizations within predicate-initial sentence patterns. Historically, the PP-nominal sentences are a unique case of prepositional phrase predicate sentences with simple noun phrase subjects, having fixed word order and nominalized subjects. Typologically, they are essentially marked for person. Changes in the PP-nominal pattern in Rabbinic Hebrew suggest that it grew closer to the evaluative pattern.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Prepositional Predicates with Nominalized Subjects in Classical Hebrew

Hebrew Studies , Volume 58 – Dec 7, 2017

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>The paper characterizes the PP–nominal (prepositional phrase + nominalization) pattern in Biblical Hebrew and Rabbinic Hebrew (e.g., &apos;it is our duty to do&apos;) and discusses its relation to the so-called evaluative or pattern (e.g., &apos;it would have been better for us to serve&apos;). In spite of the resemblance between the two, it is argued that the former is a distinct pattern both historically and typologically, but that both share similar generalizations within predicate-initial sentence patterns. Historically, the PP-nominal sentences are a unique case of prepositional phrase predicate sentences with simple noun phrase subjects, having fixed word order and nominalized subjects. Typologically, they are essentially marked for person. Changes in the PP-nominal pattern in Rabbinic Hebrew suggest that it grew closer to the evaluative pattern.</p>

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Dec 7, 2017

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