Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Peshat and Derash: Plain and Applied Meaning in Rabbinic Exegesis (review)

Peshat and Derash: Plain and Applied Meaning in Rabbinic Exegesis (review) cusses "Biblical Hebrew crb, 'to go surety', and Its Nominal Forms." S. David Sperling, in "Biblical rbm I and rbm II," argues, incorrectly in my opinion, that there are two distinct Semitic roots, one meaning "to have mercy on," the other "to love." Finally, Nahum M. Waldman offers a quintessentially Heldian approach to ancient Semitic interdialectal semantic equivalencies in his study of ''The Imagery of Clothing, Covering, and Overpowering." In nearly every one of the articles, though, the impact of Held's approach is readily apparent, if less so than in this. Taken as a whole, this is hardly a volume destined to make a strong impact on the course of scholarship in its fields. It does, however, constitute a good introduction to the approach and impact of a memorable scholar and truly unique teacher. Stephen A. Kaufman Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion Cincinnati, OH 45220 PESHA T AND DERASH: PLAIN AND APPLIED MEANING IN RABBINIC EXEGESIS. By David Weiss Halivni. pp. xii + 249. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991. Cloth, $35.00. The gap between the peshat-what we all sense a text really means-and what the rabbis write about it can be a problem both http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Peshat and Derash: Plain and Applied Meaning in Rabbinic Exegesis (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 33 (1) – Oct 5, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/national-association-of-professors-of-hebrew/peshat-and-derash-plain-and-applied-meaning-in-rabbinic-exegesis-D2a1JFu90B
Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

cusses "Biblical Hebrew crb, 'to go surety', and Its Nominal Forms." S. David Sperling, in "Biblical rbm I and rbm II," argues, incorrectly in my opinion, that there are two distinct Semitic roots, one meaning "to have mercy on," the other "to love." Finally, Nahum M. Waldman offers a quintessentially Heldian approach to ancient Semitic interdialectal semantic equivalencies in his study of ''The Imagery of Clothing, Covering, and Overpowering." In nearly every one of the articles, though, the impact of Held's approach is readily apparent, if less so than in this. Taken as a whole, this is hardly a volume destined to make a strong impact on the course of scholarship in its fields. It does, however, constitute a good introduction to the approach and impact of a memorable scholar and truly unique teacher. Stephen A. Kaufman Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion Cincinnati, OH 45220 PESHA T AND DERASH: PLAIN AND APPLIED MEANING IN RABBINIC EXEGESIS. By David Weiss Halivni. pp. xii + 249. New York: Oxford University Press, 1991. Cloth, $35.00. The gap between the peshat-what we all sense a text really means-and what the rabbis write about it can be a problem both

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1992

There are no references for this article.