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Oral World and Written Word: Ancient Israelite Literature (review)

Oral World and Written Word: Ancient Israelite Literature (review) (both Corinth and Ephesus are claimed as the site of Paul's longest stay in a place), rare misspellings (Pansanius for Pausanius? [po 363]) and some inexplicable glitches (Athens discussed without mention of Alexander's empire building) are relatively minor problems. The volume is sturdily presented on quality paper, yielding better photo reproduction than some selections of photos present. It can be used in Religious Studies classes at parish, synagogue, high school, and perhaps college courses. It seems a bit thin for seminarians unless they are relatively blank slates on Middle Eastern history and culture. Roger S. Boraas Upsala College East Orange, NJ 07017 ORAL WORLD AND WRITTEN WORD: ANCIENT ISRAELITE LITERATURE. By Susan Niditch. Library of Ancient Israel. Pp. xi + 170. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996. Cloth. The modem study of folklore and the modem study of the Hebrew Bible have often traveled hand in hand. It was Herder who first joined these two fields together, rhapsodizing about the wisdom of das Volk and the pure, untrammeled spirituality of the "shepherd's stories" in Genesis. Hermann Gunkel raised the folkloric analysis of the Hebrew Bible to a new level, particularly by inventing the task of Form Criticism in seeking http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Oral World and Written Word: Ancient Israelite Literature (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 39 (1) – Oct 5, 1998

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
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Abstract

(both Corinth and Ephesus are claimed as the site of Paul's longest stay in a place), rare misspellings (Pansanius for Pausanius? [po 363]) and some inexplicable glitches (Athens discussed without mention of Alexander's empire building) are relatively minor problems. The volume is sturdily presented on quality paper, yielding better photo reproduction than some selections of photos present. It can be used in Religious Studies classes at parish, synagogue, high school, and perhaps college courses. It seems a bit thin for seminarians unless they are relatively blank slates on Middle Eastern history and culture. Roger S. Boraas Upsala College East Orange, NJ 07017 ORAL WORLD AND WRITTEN WORD: ANCIENT ISRAELITE LITERATURE. By Susan Niditch. Library of Ancient Israel. Pp. xi + 170. Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1996. Cloth. The modem study of folklore and the modem study of the Hebrew Bible have often traveled hand in hand. It was Herder who first joined these two fields together, rhapsodizing about the wisdom of das Volk and the pure, untrammeled spirituality of the "shepherd's stories" in Genesis. Hermann Gunkel raised the folkloric analysis of the Hebrew Bible to a new level, particularly by inventing the task of Form Criticism in seeking

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1998

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