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Notes on the Greek Text of Deuteronomy (review)

Notes on the Greek Text of Deuteronomy (review) N. Fernández Marcos Hebrew Studies, Volume 38, 1997, pp. 120-123 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.1997.0043 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/437035/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:37 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 38 (1997) 120 Reviews Wilson turns finally to the deuteronomic law code, and particularly to the use of the phrase "before the Lord." Of its sixteen occurrences, two (in Deuteronomy 24) are clearly metaphorical. For almost all the remainder, however, there is a close and explicit connection with reference to the place which Yahweh should choose. The verbs used with the phrase are "eat," "rejoice," "stand," "say," "set down," and "worship." In these contexts, "before the Lord" is to be taken in its literal sense. The historical particu­ larity of time and place, together with the clear preference for the preposition "before" even when, as in the case of the verb "say," another preposition would perhaps have been more appropriate, clearly suggest that the deuteronom(ist)ic author wishes to imply the real and actual presence of Yahweh at his chosen place where the actions denoted by these verbs are to be carried out. If the author had wished to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Notes on the Greek Text of Deuteronomy (review)

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681

Abstract

N. Fernández Marcos Hebrew Studies, Volume 38, 1997, pp. 120-123 (Review) Published by National Association of Professors of Hebrew DOI: https://doi.org/10.1353/hbr.1997.0043 For additional information about this article https://muse.jhu.edu/article/437035/summary Access provided at 18 Feb 2020 04:37 GMT from JHU Libraries Hebrew Studies 38 (1997) 120 Reviews Wilson turns finally to the deuteronomic law code, and particularly to the use of the phrase "before the Lord." Of its sixteen occurrences, two (in Deuteronomy 24) are clearly metaphorical. For almost all the remainder, however, there is a close and explicit connection with reference to the place which Yahweh should choose. The verbs used with the phrase are "eat," "rejoice," "stand," "say," "set down," and "worship." In these contexts, "before the Lord" is to be taken in its literal sense. The historical particu­ larity of time and place, together with the clear preference for the preposition "before" even when, as in the case of the verb "say," another preposition would perhaps have been more appropriate, clearly suggest that the deuteronom(ist)ic author wishes to imply the real and actual presence of Yahweh at his chosen place where the actions denoted by these verbs are to be carried out. If the author had wished to

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 2011

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