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Miscelánea de Estudios Arabes y Hebraicos (review)

Miscelánea de Estudios Arabes y Hebraicos (review) the afterword and some of the articles may make the book less accessible to readers outside the world of Jewish Studies. I began this review with a quote from a New York Times news story. Allow me to end it with a citation from another non-academic source, a recent American novel. Philip Roth's Operation Shylock is surely the first American novel to have a Hebrew epigram (though a Hebrew word for "whale" appears in the opening pages of Moby Dick). The epigram is the verse from Genesis which describes Jacob's struggle with the angel. The import of this epigram is not clear until the very end of this long book. Towards the novel's end, when Roth is waiting in a Jerusalem yeshiva classroom for a meeting with the head of the Mossad, he contemplates some Hebrew writing on the board: On the blackboard I saw something written in Hebrew. Nine words. I couldn't read one of them. Four decades after those three years of afternoon classes at Hebrew school, I could no longer even identify the letters of the alphabet .... But how could anything come of going to Hebrew school? The teachers were lonely foreigners, poorly paid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Hebrew Studies National Association of Professors of Hebrew

Miscelánea de Estudios Arabes y Hebraicos (review)

Hebrew Studies , Volume 35 (1) – Oct 5, 1994

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Publisher
National Association of Professors of Hebrew
Copyright
Copyright © National Association of Professors of Hebrew
ISSN
2158-1681
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the afterword and some of the articles may make the book less accessible to readers outside the world of Jewish Studies. I began this review with a quote from a New York Times news story. Allow me to end it with a citation from another non-academic source, a recent American novel. Philip Roth's Operation Shylock is surely the first American novel to have a Hebrew epigram (though a Hebrew word for "whale" appears in the opening pages of Moby Dick). The epigram is the verse from Genesis which describes Jacob's struggle with the angel. The import of this epigram is not clear until the very end of this long book. Towards the novel's end, when Roth is waiting in a Jerusalem yeshiva classroom for a meeting with the head of the Mossad, he contemplates some Hebrew writing on the board: On the blackboard I saw something written in Hebrew. Nine words. I couldn't read one of them. Four decades after those three years of afternoon classes at Hebrew school, I could no longer even identify the letters of the alphabet .... But how could anything come of going to Hebrew school? The teachers were lonely foreigners, poorly paid

Journal

Hebrew StudiesNational Association of Professors of Hebrew

Published: Oct 5, 1994

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